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Saturday, July 20, 2013

What are names for these devices people use when they cannot walk: 'cane', 'crutches', 'walker', 'wheelchair', and 'scooter' respectively in creole?

cane, walker  - baton oubyen badin, also machèt
wheelchair - chèz woulant
crutches - beki
scooter - scooter, twotinèt (pou ti mopèd de pye yo)

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10 comments:

  1. Can 'deyambilatè' be also used for 'walker'? Okay what are words for 'stretcher' or 'gurney'?

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    Replies
    1. wi, ou kapab si ou vle.

      stretcher - branka

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  2. Is 'wakè' okay to use as well since I hear many Haitians say it for 'walker'? Is it okay to also use 'sivyè' for 'stretcher'? Also, what does one call those who transport a patient from one part of the hospital to another part on a gurney/stretcher?

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    Replies
    1. I haven't used the word 'wakè'.
      Yes, we do say sivyè or branka.

      In some US hospitals, it's the volunteers who transport patients who are, for example, getting discharged or going for a test within the hospital; in other hospitals it is the hospital's auxiliary help that does this job; and they also called them TECHS, don't they.

      The way the hospitals are running now, they do not hire someone specific JUST to transport patients (do they?). If they do, I think they call them "transport" - Anyway....each hospital has a different name for them, depending on the load of duty these people are responsible for.

      In Creole I would call them yon oksilyè, yon èd swayan unless I am told their title is specific to transport.

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  3. I hate to be a burden but I have my mother and aunt use the word 'machpye' for walker. What do you think?

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    Replies
    1. I guess if that's what works for them then that's what works. If they understand each other this way, then ....good :)
      machpye is Haitian Creole for step stool, step ladder, walkway, car running board, etc...
      Dakò :)

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  4. Hello Mandaly
    Two months ago, I found the creole equivalent for 'walker': machèt. I want to add this alongside the others that can be used for 'walker'. What do you think?

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    Replies
    1. Awesome.
      Is it Haitian Creole?

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    2. Yes, the word 'machèt' is a Haitian creole word. I found it in a Haitian creole - English dictionary. I was excited to find it because it meant another way of expressing the same idea. I LOVE learning other ways of saying or expressing the same thing; it shows that the creole language is fluid and alive and as you said in one of your earlier responses in another post that the creole is full of expressions. I love to share new things I have discovered(Haitian creole words, expressions or constructions) on this website because I want you and others(native and non-native speakers) to learn and expand your knowledge of the Haitian language just as you have done with this website.

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    3. Thanks. That is helpful. I'll add it to the list :)

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