Bonjou! Learn to Speak Haitian Creole

Bonjou! ...Mèsi! ...E Orevwa! Check out the Audio Lesson of the Week. Do as many exercises as you need. Take an online QUIZ and get your answers right away. Finish a crossword puzzle. Reinforce your learning with the Audio/Video exercises. Search for English or Haitian Creole words translation. Also search the whole site for expressions, idioms and grammar rules. And ask questions about the language in the ASK ME ANYTHING section.
Most requested translations added here for your convenience: I love you → Mwen renmen w. I miss you → Mwen sonje w. My love!Lanmou mwen!

Sunday, May 3, 2015

Hello, what are words for this verbal expression "to stand someone up" in creole? For example, "My date stood me up last night."

I have always used 'bay koutba' for that expression :)
bay koutba - to fail or deceive someone
ex: W ap ban m koutba.

Another expression for 'deceiving' or 'lying to someone' is 'woule de bò'
Ex: Poukisa w ap woule m de bò konsa? Ou genlè panse se yon ti moun mwen ye.

Haitian Creole ↔ English Reference, Look up Haitian Creole and English Words

What are words for "roommate"(apartment, hospital, camp, etc)? Also, I had a discussion with my dad;.......

You said:
"what are words for "roommate"(apartment,
hospital, camp, etc)?  
Also, I had a discussion with my dad; he said that the
word "mis" can mean "nurse", nurse aide or assistant, or a female nurse" and
that "enfimye" is use for  "male nurse" and "enfimyè" is used for female nurse.
Of course, we use "nès" for both male and female nurse because of the prevalence
of the english language and because of the haitian diaspora in the United
States. I  am well aware of that one, but I beg to differ with the word "mis"
because I tend to reserve  that for a nurse(male or female). I am not sure what
are words for "nurse assistant" except that I say "mis asistan" or "enfimiye or
enfimyè assistant" or "nès asistan". I am not sure if they are correct. Can you
sort all of this out and also supply the appropriate words for all of them and
then some?"

Mandaly says:

roommate - kolokatè, kolokatris

Your father is right about the word 'mis'. Mis is derived from miss/mistress which is the title for a young woman. I think it might have eased into the H. Creole language as hospital patients (and soldiers) were calling for the nurse "Miss!" at a time when male nurses were not popular yet.
When I was growing up I do recall women saying, "M pral fè mis lè m gran." "Se yon mis ou ye?"
I would prefer to use enfimye or enfimyè for male nurses.

Nurse asistants are called oksilyè.

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How would you say "I have to take an exam" in h.creole and how would you say "I graduated last year". Thanks Mandaly

I have to take an exam.
Mwen dwe pran yon egzamen.
Fòk mwen pran yon egzamen.

I graduated last year.
Mwen te diplome ane pase.
Mwen te pran diplòm mwen lane pase

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Monday, April 27, 2015

How can I use chirepit in a sentence - i've said MWEN PA VLE CHIREPIT AVE W. IS THAT RIGHT?

What is 'kakadyab'? Is that a ghost?

Hi Mandaly! What is 'fe yon jan ave m non souple' thanks

I've noticed some of the Haitians I know get unreasonably angry (from an American perspective) if you ask them to repeat themselves (just generally). Is there any way to deal with this? It's pretty frustrating.

Hmmm... this could be subjective :)
Some people do get frustrated, upset and then overly excited if they're not getting their point across.

If this happens because of language barrier such as you're not understanding what they're saying fully, they might worry that they sound unintelligent, that you're talking down to them or that you know how to speak their language better than them (which is, of course, not the case). Be sure to tell them that you're still learning their language and that some words are unfamiliar to you.
Dakò :)
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Bonswa Mandaly! Koman'w ye? I was wondering if you knew any common sayings or proverbs in h.creole and the explanations behind them? Like for example.."jan chat mache se pa konsal kenbe rat,or "le bab kamarad ou pran dife, met paw la tranp"or "se sot ki bay, enbesil ki pran"....things like that. If you do know any more, please share them with me! Mesi davans!

You said:
Bonswa Mandaly! Koman'w ye? I was wondering if
you knew any common sayings or proverbs in h.creole and the explanations behind
them? Like for example.."jan chat mache se pa konsal kenbe rat,or "le bab
kamarad ou pran dife, met paw la tranp"or "se sot ki bay, enbesil ki
pran"....things like that. If you do know any more, please share them with me!
Mesi davans!
 
Mandaly says:

Bonswa zanmi,
 There are many many Haitian proverbs, I only know  a few of them. Most of the ones that I know I've learned from my mom and grandma:
The proverb "jan chat mache se pa konsa l kenbe rat", my mom would use to warn me about boys :)
 
I can only share with you the ones that we (mostly my mom) use most often at home. The followings are not word for word translation:
 
Byen pre pa lakay
about seeing a task to completion 100%. When you’re ‘almost there’ that doesn't mean you’re “there’.
Zòrèy pa dwe janm pi long pase tèt about not overstepping your bounds
Je wè, bouch pe it’s not always wise to talk about everything you see.
 Brav pa pale men li aji basically, action speaks louder than words

Ti bouton mennen maleng how some very small things can take a life of their own
Mezi lajan w mezi wanga w basically,getting what you’re worth
Makak a ke pa janbe dife think carefully about your actions if you don’t want your family to pay for them
Si dimanch pral bèl depi nan vandredi ou konnen basically about intuition
Bay kou bliye, pote mak sonje  the person on the receiving end never forgets
Pawòl nan kè pa gate zanmikeeping some things to yourself might prevent you from saying things you could never take back

Other meaningful ones I remember from when I was younger:
Lè ti poul cho dèyè manman malfini pase l pran l this one is about not being too eager, about using more restraint

Sèl kouto ki konnen sa k nan kè yanm about things you can only know from experience

Fò w konn la pou w al a experience counts, it delivers

Tout bèt jennen mòde anyone who is provoked will fight back

and my favorite: Se mwen ki dòmi ak Jan, se mwen k pou di w si Jan wonfle. you cannot know my private life better than me.

There are a couple of good books about Haitian proverbs which you may be able to find online and also by googling Haitian proverbs, etc…. 

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Friday, April 24, 2015

Are there people in Haiti who spoke rough with heavy r, p, t, and d consonants? If so what region would you say they would most likely be found? If a person speaks creole "heavy" or "well-pronounced", does this mean that they are speaking with a Frenchified accent? What does "ou ap pale kreyòl yon ti jan lou" mean? How could I correct that?

I’m not sure I understand what you mean by the “heavy r, p, t and d consonants”, but it’s usually a foreigner who ‘pale kreyòl lou’ which means to ‘speak Creole with a heavy accent’. 
We do find northern and southern accents in Haiti as well as regional differences in word usage. We have so many variations in word usage in different parts of Haiti, some we know about and others we haven’t heard of yet, that there would need to be some research or study done so that we can identify them all.

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Thursday, April 23, 2015

How can I type accent marks on my American keyboard?

Have you tried this link? Accented and foreign characters
Or you can google ....how to write foreign characters...

Best of luck :)

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Here is what I wrote in Creole and it was apparently incomprehensible to my Haitian friend. Can you tell me what I did wrong? ...

You said:
"Here is what I wrote in Creole and it was
apparently incomprehensible to my Haitian friend. Can you tell me what I did
wrong?  

Mwen pa te ka mande nou anvan paske mwen pa te konn kijan ou di
kourvreli nan Kreyol.  Mwen te chawzi li espesyalman pou li.  Mwen te eseye di'w
anvan, mwen pa konnen mo a "bedspread".  Kounyea mwen konnen ou di li"kouvreli".
Mwen pa ka mande ou si ou renemn sila a paske mwen pa konnen mo sa.  

Please
tell me how you would say this so it can be understood:  

I couldn't ask you
before because I didn't know how to say "bedspread" in Creole.  I chose the
bedspread especially for her.  I tried to ask you about it before but I didn't
know the word for bedspread.  Now I know that it is called a kouvreli.  I
coudn't ask you if she liked it because I didn't know the word for it. "

Mandaly said:


You did a pretty good job with the Creole there. The only difference I could bring up is that I would have used more short forms: 
“Mwen pa t ka mande w anvan paske mwen pa t konnen kouman yo di 'kouvreli' an Kreyòl. Mwen te chwazi kouvreli a espesyalman pou ou. Mwen te eseye mande w sa anvan men mwen pa t konnen konnen kouman pou m di 'kouvreli'. Kounye a mwen konnen se kouvreli yo di. Mwen pa t ka mande w si w te renmen li paske mwen pa t konnen kouman pou m di l.





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Hello, I'm used in saying "tetòye" means "pillowcase" in english. That is how my parents say it, but I often hear other people say "sakdòye". Is one the correct way in saying it or are both correct? Is it a region to region thing? Also, are there other ways of saying "pillowcase" in creole besides the ones mentioned above?

Bonjou, Mandaly! M gen yon kesyon. Kisa di, "N'ap pou tan" nan angle? I had a dream some time ago, and this was said in it. M te tradui konsa, "We're for time." but that doesn't make any sense. So I wonder are there any Haitian sayings or proverbs like this? What does this mean? (I hope I said that right).

If you're dreaming in Creole that's awesome :)

Yeah, you've pretty much translated it correctly. It doesn't mean much in H. Creole. ..may be a hidden significance?

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What does Ti Pam Nan mean? I'm obsessed with the song from Mikaben and JPerry.

Almost in an endearing tone, it basically means mine....

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Hello Mandaly, I know that "thick" means "epe" or "pwès" in creole, but what are other words for "thick" in all contexts? Also, what are words for "to thicken" or "to become thick"?

You can also use 'founi' for thick when you are talking about hair, for example: Chive l founi. - Her hair is thick.
to become thick - kaye, vin pwès, kondanse

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Tuesday, April 14, 2015

I have just learned that "anfonse" means to sink in English. What are other words or verbal expressions for "to sink"? Also, what are other words in creole that means "to knock down(someone or something)", "to dismount" or "to dismantle". I may know one or two that means this, but I feel like there are more. I want to know more if they exist.

To sink - koule, plonje, fè fon, anfondre, nofraje, fè nofraj, nwaye, neye, etc...

There are so many Haitian Creole words that can be used to say to knock down someone ..... I can only name a few:
demanbre, demachwele, krabinen, toufounen, filange, filange, domaje, maspinen, kokobe, etc....
there's probably 50 more.....

the same goes for to knock down something .... dechouke, deplase, demantle, demonte, deboulonnen
etc...

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Sunday, April 12, 2015

Bonswa Mandaly! One quick question, I was looking to use the Creole word fonse, but I found so many definitions that I’m confused now. Can I use it to say –they broke the door–yo fonse pot la? Also what are other ways you can use that word? Thanks.

1.
Use defonseto knock down, to dismount, to dismantle
They broke down the door…
Yo te defonse pòt la…..

Also….

2.
fonse (sou) (verb) – to attack, to charge at, to assault
He charged at me like a bull.
Li fonse sou mwen kon yon towo bèf.

3.
Fonse (verb) – to frown
She always has a frown.
Sousi l toujou fonse.

4.
And then there’s anfonse
Anfonse – to sink
The more he tried to get out of the water, the deeper he sank.

Tank l t ap eseye soti nan dlo a se tank li t ap anfonse plis toujou.

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Saturday, April 11, 2015

How would you translate the following sentence in Haitian creole. They refused that I finish my sentence.

They refused that I finish my sentence
Yo refize m fin di sa m ap di a.

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Could you explain why a family would have a newborn baby taste family blood?

Wow... a cruel move
It's supposed to be a paternity test.
The newborn baby is given a drop of  the claimed father's blood.
It is said that the baby will die if the blood is not from his real father.
Don't ask me about the science behind it .... I wouldn't know that.
Whether this is proven to work or not, I consider it a heartless method considering that there's a 50% chance that the baby would die.

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what is chage kou lapoy?

Could it be chaje kou lapolòy? which is the same as chaje kou legba - filled to capapcity

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What are words for "hicky" in creole? What does "nan miyann" mean in english?

nan myann or lanmyann - screw you, the heck with you, go to hell, etc...

hickey se yon mak sou po

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Thursday, April 9, 2015

Hi Mandaly, how would you say "actions speak louder than words" in h.creole?

Actions speak louder than words.
Pale met la pa anyen, se aksyon ki konte

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Mandaly, when a person says, "zafel", what does that mean? Whenever I hear this, it's usually said in a "not-caring" type of manner towards another person as a retort.

It means 'to take full responsibility what you're about to do',  it's your responsibility, it's on your head, sometimes it means 'who cares' ....'if you don't care then why should I care'

How to use it?
Use it with pronouns.

Zafè w or zafè pa w means it's your responsibility

Zafè l or zafè pa l means it's his responsibility

Zafè yo or zafè pa yo means it's their responsibility, it's on their heads

Get it?

Example:
Your friend has a bad habit of riding his bike without a helmet and every time you talk to him about it he doesn't listen. He knows the danger of riding without a helmet but he just doesn't care. So you'll say: Zafè pa w! Whatever happens to you is your fault!

another example:
Your other friend refuses to come to work on time and knows that she'll lose her job if she doesn't change this bad habit, but she doesn't care .... zafè pa l!

another example:
If they fall asleep on the job they'll get fired but they don't care and fall asleep anyways ....zafè pa yo!

one more example:
I might get arrested if I drive with a suspended license but I drive anyway.....zafè pa m!  it's my responsibility....my business

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Monday, April 6, 2015

Hi Mandaly! Joyeuses Paques! Just one question, what does "manke yon moun dega" mean in h.creole?

Merci! Merci! Joyeuses Pâques a ou menm tou :)

Manke yon moun dega means to be disrespectful toward someone, to be discourteous, to be "out-of-line"

Timoun nan ap manke m dega.
The kid is being disrespectful toward me.

Se madan marye m ye wi, apa w ap manke m dega!
I'm a married woman, you're being offensive!

Ti gason t ap manke manman l dega.
The boy was being rude to his mother.

Pa manke n dega tande.
Don't be rude to us

Apa w ap manke moun dega.
You are being rude.

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Sunday, April 5, 2015

"lang lou- heavy tongue Is also use for lisp

You said:
"lang lou- heavy tongue is also use for lisp "

Mandaly says:


Yes thanks :)

Haitians also use 'lang lou' to describe a heavy language accent:
Lang li lou lè l ap pale Kreyòl.

Also they use 'lang lou' to describe someone that's unable to talk because of a strange anxiety or when in the presence of an evil being (people experience that in a dream state or when they're in between being asleep and awake):

Pandan m sou kabann nan, nan fènwa a, mwen santi te gen de zombi nan pye kabann nan. Lang mwen vin lou, m pa t ka pale.
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Hello, I know that "evanwi/evanoui" means to faint or to pass out. However, what are other words or verbal phrases or synonyms for "to faint" in creole?...

You said:
Hello, I know that "evanwi/evanoui" means to
faint or to pass out.  However, what are other words or verbal phrases or
synonyms for "to faint" in creole?
Examples, "He always faints at the sight of
blood." or "She almost fainted from the pain." or  "I thought he'd faint when I
kissed him."

Mandaly says:
We say endispoze, fè endispozisyon, or pèdi konesans in H. Creole.

Li endispoze
Li fè yon endispozisyon
Li pèdi konesans

I have never used evanoui - it sounds French

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What are words or related words for "computer hacker" in creole? For example....

You said:
What are words or related words for "computer
hacker" in creole? For example, "Even if a hacker is successful at breaking into
a system, they can't deface the web site." or "The problem with protecting
computer systems today is that the enemy is not a teenage hacker in a darkened
bedroom." 

What are words for "to hack" in creole? For example, "Anyone, even
a child with limited or no computer know-how, can use these packages to hack
into your systems." or "When I logged into the social network, I discovered I'd
been hacked." or "He hacked the firm's personnel database."

mandaly says:
We use pirat and pirate

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What are words for "whistleblower" or "informant"?

You said:

"What are words for "whistleblower" or
"informant"? For example, "We owe it to a small group of brave whistle-blowers
that we know about the infractions at all." or "When with due circumspection
Napoleon was informed that Moscow was empty, he looked angrily at his informant,
turned away, and silently continued to walk to and fro."

Mandaly says:
We say rapòtè, akizatè, denonsyatè, espyon

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Ki sa "de ti pijon sou pis la" vle di?

Sounds to me like - two lovebirds ....on a dancefloor

or it could be actual birds.

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hat does "pale sou lang" mean in english? Is "sou lang" used with other verbs? Does it carry other meanings?

pale sou lang - to have a lisp.

Non, we do not have any other expressions with  - sou lang.
but other expressions you can find with lang are:

vire lang - to change you word/story, to recant a story
lang alèlè - motormouth, blabbermouth
chat pran lang - cat's got one's tongue
bay kout lang - to to make false or damaging statements against someone

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Saturday, April 4, 2015

How do you say in Haitian Creole, "Stop lying"?

Do RETE and WETE have the same meaning.Are they interchangeable?

No.
Rete - to stop, to remain, to stay, ...
     "Kobyen mango ki rete nan panye a?"
      "Ki kote w rete?"
      "Rete la. Pa deplase."

Wete - to take out, to remove
    "Wete kiyè a nan bouch anvan w pale."

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What are words for "red blood cells"? What are words for "red blood cells"?

selil wouj, globil wouj - red blood cells
globil blan - white blood cells

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How do you say, " A change is coming soon", in creole

How do I say "thank you for coming " In Haitian creole/

Thank you for coming.
Mèsi deske w te vini (singular)
Mèsi deske nou te vini (plural)

I want to thank you for coming.
Mwen remèsye w deske ou te vini.

I wanted to thank you for coming.
Mwen te vle remèsye w deske ou te vini.

Thanks for stopping by.
Mèsi pou visit la.

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Thursday, March 26, 2015

.... Would "lari blanch" indicate a path covered in snow?

Maybe. It depends on the context.

Lari a tou blanch.
The street is deserted.

Lari tou blan ak lanèj
The street is covered in snow.

One of the meaning of 'blanch' in Haitian Creole is vacancy, lack of (something) or desertedness:

Bay teren an blanch.
Bay kay la blanch
to leave

pase yon nuit blanch
to have a sleepless night


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Mandi can you help me with this. i'm looking for the translation for the word meaningful and google translate gives me TOUCHE, is that right? I wanted to use to say ...a more meaningful relationship to Jesus. Mèsi anpil

meaningful adj. - konsekan, enpòtan, serye, lojik

a more meaningful relationship with Jesus
yon relasyon ki pi serye avèk Jezi

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Wednesday, March 25, 2015

what is this man saying to me? bondye fem konen neg anba pa jwe pou fanm yo

It says,
"Lord, let me know, man down there don't play around for their women."

(P.S. Your emails keep getting returned to my inbox - even when I do a reply -----not sure why.  Do you have a different email address?)

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Tuesday, March 24, 2015

What does it mean when someone says "pa pale konsa" to me? I understand pa pale means not speaking, but what does it mean when they add "konsa" on the end?

konsa - in this manner, this way, like that, so much, so, in such a way

1. Pa pale konsa.
    Don't talk like that.

2. Pa mache konsa.
    Don't walk like that.

3.  Fè li konsa.
     Do it like that.


4. Poukisa ou fache konsa?
    Why are you so angry?

5. Pouki w atriste konsa?
    Why are you so sad?
   

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Monday, March 23, 2015

Lè yon fanm fè anpil pitit byen enganm anpi youn nan pitit yo soti tou mal eske sa rele kras vant?

'Kras vant' se dènye pitit yon fanm, pafwa, pa't menm espere si l t ap genyen.

Haitian Creole ↔ English Reference, Look up Haitian Creole and English Words

What does kabre?

It's used in sports (soccer),  and means to trick a player while playing a sports game.

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For those who are having trouble with writing Haitian Creole 'accents' or 'foreign characters' on your computer, here's help......

aplikasyon pou aksan fòs la

You know how important these foreign characters are, don't you?
You want to write pòt (door) but you end up writing pot (to bring)
or maybe it takes an average of 5 keystrokes to achieve these: À à È è Ò ò
and you don't want to go through all that.
So here's a trusted link for adding an app on your PC that will make writing the characters easier.
Once you've install the app, all it will take is to press on the corresponding letters twice on your keyboard, and you're there.
You may toggle the ALT + K key to make the app ACTIVE or INACTIVE depending whether you're writing Kreyòl or other languages.
The program produces an audible confirmation of its mode (double BEEP Haiti keyboard; single BEEP USA keyboard). 
A Haitian flag icon is added if you wish to use it as the icon for the app.

This app comes to you compliment of Guyto Bichotte who created it. Thanks Guyto (67716C32303134).
Link: https://www.facebook.com/download/1621890418030470/AyitiEtaziniKybd.zip  

Would "manman" in "manman lajan" mean "huge pile of money" and in what other ways can you use "manman"?

Manman lajan is a sum of money on which interest may be paid. It's the principal amount (of money).

Haitians us manman as an interjection (and papa too):
Adye manman!
Adye papa!

And they also use it to say big, huge, massive
(They use papa the same way too.)
yon gwo manman kay
yon manman bèf
yon manman kanson
etc...

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How do you say to show-off in Haitian Creole. My translator does not know that word yet. Thanks

to show off - fè chèlbè, fè gran panpan, fè enteresant

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As you know, I am focusing on the official orthography. I want to get to the point....

You said:

As you know, I am focusing on the official
orthography.  I want to get to the point, where I can read words from the way
they are written; not because I already know them.  I want get to the point,
where I can write them; not because I have already seen them.

So, we have the
word "cheve" for hair.  Now, if I am not mistaken the pronunciation is the same
as the French "cheveux".  However, "e" in "cheve" would not seem to rhyme with
the "e" words like "peyi", "kwe", and "vle".  But use of "è" would seem wrong
too, since the syllables in "cheve" don't rhyme with the words "mèt", "fèt", and
"lèt".

And so, I am not sure how the proper pronunciation of "cheve" is
arrived at from the use of this spelling; unless of course, I am mispronouncing
the word as French?

Thanks!

Mandaly says:

Haitians say 'cheve' or 'chive' and it's not pronounced like the French word 'cheveux'
We use the Haitian Creole letter 'e' to say 'cheve'.  Remember that the french sound 'eux' does not exist in H. Creole.

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Okay, I am going back to beginning 2010, because I think its the best way.....

You said:

Okay, I am going back to beginning 2010,
because I think its the best way to review.

<<<àn pronounced like the
"an"sound in "Liliane" - Please say outloud: bekàn, soutàn, avwàn,
lamàn>>>

Clearly this letter has been dropped from the Official Orthography
with what has it been replaced?

I am thinking maybe
"yen"?

Thanks!

Mandaly says:
The accented 'a' tells us that 'an' and 'àn' are pronounced differently.
Egzanp: pan, pàn, and pann are each pronounced differently. They each have their own meaning too.
 
Haitian Creole ↔ English Reference, Look up Haitian Creole and English Words

Konsènan mo kreyòl yo Ayisyen gen dwa di menm mo a diferan fason. Kijan pou ou konnen kiles ki pi bon? Pa egzanp lè moun nan santi fredi genyen nan yo ki di yo –frèt- tandiske gen lòt ki di yo -fwèt- kilès mo ki pibon?

Se pa yon afè de kilès ki pi bon, se senpleman yon diferans rejyonal nan fason yo di mo yo. Mwen kwè se yon bagay pou respekte. Diferan rejyon nan peyi a ka pwononse, di, oubyen ekri menm konsèp la diferan fason. Nou pa ka rejte sa.

Haitian Creole ↔ English Reference, Look up Haitian Creole and English Words

what does "sa kap fet pino?" mean

It means that 'pino' might be somebody's name

Sa k ap fèt ... 
What's up....?
What's going on ....?

Haitian Creole ↔ English Reference, Look up Haitian Creole and English Words

Thursday, March 19, 2015

What are words for "appeal" and "to appeal" in this context? Here are examples ......

You said:
 "What are words for "appeal" and "to appeal"
in this context? 
Here are examples as a noun, "My lawyer said the court's
decision wasn't correct and that we should file for an appeal." or "their appeal
was denied in the superior court." or "The decision was reversed on appeal."

Here are examples as a verb, "He appealed, arguing that there was not enough
evidence to convict him." or "She lost the case and appealed the following
month." or "We plan to appeal the court's decision." or "The ruling can be
appealed within 30 days." or "The verdict was appealed to a higher court." or
"He was found guilty but appealed immediately."

appeal
apèl

to make an appeal
fè apèl

to appeal against a decision  
fè apèl kont yon desizyon

to appeal against a verdict  
Fè apèl kont yon vèdik

Supreme court
Lakou kasasyon




Haitian Creole ↔ English Reference, Look up Haitian Creole and English Words

Please translate LONG KOU KE PIS

It means narrowly, barely, a hairsbreadth escape

Long kou ke pis machin nan te frape m - The car just barely missed me.


Haitian Creole ↔ English Reference, Look up Haitian Creole and English Words

The Official Alphabet which was approved, I think, in 1979 has letters: "ou" and "w". At times,.....

You said:
"Mandaly,

The Official Alphabet which was approved, I think, in 1979 has
letters:  "ou" and "w".

At times, I have seen the English word "you" written
as "ou" in Creole, and at other times, written as "w".  Also, when I have seen
it written as "w" it is not always in the situation where it might form a spoken
sound contraction (such as "kisa w ap manje?").

So, how should I write, "I
haven't seen you for a while"?

M pa we ou

or

M pa we w

Furthermore,
when we talk about contractions, there are mandatory contractions and optional
contractions.  When should optional contractions be written?

For example:  "I
would like"

Mwen ta renmen ...

or 

M ta renmen ...

Are there any
rules as to when optional contractions should be employed in writing?  (Because
in English unless you are writing in vernacular, you should avoid
contractions.)

Part of what I am asking is should contractions which are
optional be uncontracted and left to the reader only if the passage is being
read out loud?  (As I know the guiding principle is that we write as we
speak/pronounce.)  If I am writing a text book on computer programming in Creole
is there a more formal style in which to write or should I write as if I were
talking to a class?  (This is not a totally hypothetical question, since I have
considered the preparation of educational materials.)

Thank you!

PS:  I am
very excited to see so many Haitians now writing their language.  When I first
learned/taught in the 1970s, it was very much a "chicken and the egg" situation.
If no Haitians could read Creole, then who would be there to read literature and
text books in Creole?  If no Haitians could write Creole, then who would author
our literature and text books.  And so, back around 1970/80, myself, the other
volunteers, and priests who ran the the community center firmly believed the key
to Haiti's future was Creole literacy and broad public education.  I am truly
happy to see that there has been progress."

Mandaly says:

1. 'w' is a short form for 'ou'. (I'm sure you know that)

2. If you see the word 'you', more than likely it's a typo. Autocorrect is awesome but not when you're trying to write another language :)  I actually had to teach my iphone and ipad to "speak" H.Creole so that it would stop correcting my texts and emails.

3. There are a few definite places where you shouldn't use contractions (or fòm kout), otherwise it's pretty much as you wish depending on the setting of the conversation, texts, or written work . Some instructors tell you that it's best to use the long form at the beginning of a sentence but if I want to say 'M ap vini demen' or 'M t ale wè l lopital la' or 'M ale. N a wè pita.' or 'W a gentan konnen' I would be more comfortable using the short form at the beginning of these sentences because that's the way I talk.

4. Some place where you cannot use contractions: after pou, san, sou towards the end of a sentence.
    a. Pote yon ti dlo pou m.
       We should say: Pote yon ti dlo pou mwen.

    b. Dlo enpòtan anpil. Ou pa ka viv san l.
       We should say: Dlo enpòtan anpil. Nou pa ka viv san li.

    c. Kote malèt la? M te mete liv mwen yo sou l men kounye a m pa wè l.
       We should say: Kote malèt la? M te mete liv mwen you sou li men kounye a m pa wè l.

Also consider words that have short forms: konnen, pote, mete, etc....
We don't usually say Mwen pa konn. we say Mwen pa konnen.
Konbyen malèt ou pote? instead of konbyen malèt ou pot?

and also no contractions after consonants:

tèt mwen instead of tèt m 
pitit li instead of pitit l
chemiz mwen instead of chemiz m
Somehow people from North Haiti make these exceptions work :) 
You know.... they say 'tèt m' (tèt anm or tèt an mwen); 'pitit l' (pitit a l or pitit a li); 'chemiz m' (chemiz anm or chemiz an mwen).  Anyways you cannot make this work if you're not from there :)


Haitian Creole ↔ English Reference, Look up Haitian Creole and English Words

how do you pronounce the phrase for "How much". Is it spelled konben or konbyen?

Haitians use these three words konbe, konben or konbyen.

Haitian Creole ↔ English Reference, Look up Haitian Creole and English Words

"Mandaly, I originally posted this in English on Facebook (a general group for Haitians & non-Haitians who want to improve their Creole ...

You said:

Mandaly,

I originally posted this in
English on Facebook (a general group for Haitians & non-Haitians who want to
improve their Creole), but I have yet to receive an answer.  I will keep it in
English, since this is a Web site for everyone to learn Haitian Creole.

I
learned to write in the late 1970's.  At that time, one could say that there was
no standardization for writing Creole, or one could say there were many
competing standards for writing Creole!  One linguistic paper I read said that
as of 1980 there were as many as 11 such standards!

I learned to read/write a
system known as Pressoir-Faublas or Faublas-Pressoir.  I haven't really spoken
Creole for more than 30 years.  But I want to read/write/speak again!  The
current Official System is based on work by the IPN.  So, I am in the process of
learning IPN.  No, longer:  "mouin ékri Kréyòl-la", but "mwen ekri Kreyòl
la".

I have no trouble with the phonemes of IPN.  But I have a lot of
confusion when it comes to punctuation.  Around 1980, I had learned the
following rules for punctuation:

Contractions with a verb:

Mouin ap di li
-> M-ap di-l

Definite articles:

liv la -> liv-la

Possesives:

liv
mouin -> liv-mouin
liv mouin an -> liv-mouin-an

Other contractions
(unknown):

Si ou fè sa -> S'ou fè sa

My confusion with IPN is that I have
seen some orthography documents describing the use of ' and - similar to the
above.  Whereas others saying that you never use "siy sa yo" (these
signs).

So, in the cases above what is the correct Official
Orthography?

When a shortened pronoun like "mwen" appears not as a
contraction, then how is it written?  For example:

Mwen pale Kreyòl. ->  M
pale Kreyòl? M' pale Kreyòl?

I am quite confused.  I have tried looking at
the writing of others, but I do see some variation.  Thus, I am asking what is
official and correct?

By the way, I have no social or political attachment to
any orthography.  Having said that:

* I do feel that the punctation I learned
does make reading easier as word grouping is easier to see and parse out in a
sentence quickly.

* My personal expertise is in computer systems.  If we want
to see computer engines do a better job with machine translation of our
language, then including additional syntactic information to aid the parsing
software is important.  Understanding Creole is highly dependent on word order
and grouping, since there are no conjugations, morphemes, etc...  Thus, it seems
machine translation of Creole is very hit or miss (as they say in Spanish "mas
menos que mas"; more miss than hit).  (BTW, as I know Chinese and it is highly
syntactic like Creole, translation engines also perform extremely poorly on
Chinese, as well.)

Nenpòt sa m te aprann depi lontan lontan; an tout ka, m ta
renmen ekri lang mwen korèk!  :)

Mèsi anpil!"


Mandaly says:

1. We've agreed not to use apostwòf or tirè: 
M pale Kreyòl. 
M ale.
Eske w ap vini demen?
Kite m an repo.
Papa m pa la.
Sa se liv mwen.
Si w fè sa m p ap kontan.

2. The Haitian Creole grammar punctuation follows the French punctuation rule.

3. Here's a link that will prove helpful.  Be sure to check out Dr. Degraff's postscript at the end of the booklet: http://on.fb.me/1zyovCk




Haitian Creole ↔ English Reference, Look up Haitian Creole and English Words

Mandaly, Okay. I cannot help myself! I have yet another question on how to write properly. I was looking at one of .....

Mandaly,

Okay.  I cannot help myself!  I
have yet another question on how to write properly.

I was looking at one of
your answers to me, and you wrote, "Antouka".  I was just writing to you, and I
wrote "an tout ka".

Of course, you know why I did this, because I know (in
the back of my head) that this is at least three separate words in French.  Even
in Creole (if we forget French), "tout" and "ka" both can stand by themselves as
separate words.

My question:  is when are words combined as you have done and
when are words separated when dealing with common
expressions?

Thanks!

Mandaly says:

This word may be written as 'antouka' or 'an tou ka'. So you were not totally off.  A lot of ‘compound’ words or concepts in French may be written as one word in H. Creole. It may be because the parts that make up the whole word or concept are not Haitian Creole words.
Example: Lune de miel –  we may  say lindemyèl or lin de myèl
 Other examples are: tranblemanntè, labib, laviktwa, monkonpè, lakansyèl, dekiprevyen, lafendimonn, alafen, etc….. 

I also wanted to add not to confuse compound French words/concept with compound H. Creole words:

Compound H. Creole words are tèt ansanm, chita tande, pote kole, mayi moulen, lese frape. 
Compound H. Creole words are not written as one string of words, the words are written separately.  

Other compound H. Creole words you write it as one or two words depending on the meaning
I like Dr. Degraff's example: ti fi or tifi?

Li se you ti fi.
Li pa tifi.
'ti fi' and 'tifi' here don't have the same meaning

Haitian Creole ↔ English Reference, Look up Haitian Creole and English Words

Hello! I'm trying to figure out the translation for Dr. Aristide's quote "Si n pa sove diyite n, Diyite n ap sove kite n." Google and Microsoft are not providing a good translation,unfortunately. I'd really appreciate the help!

"Si n pa sove diyite n, Diyite n ap sove kite n." 

In this quote, the first “sove” means to defend, to salvage, to save.

The second “sove”  means to run away, or to flee

Diyite”, of course, translates dignity or self-respect

sove kite” translates to run away from..... literally to run away and leave.  
Egzanp: Li sove kite mHe ran away and left me.

So literally, the quote says “If we don’t defend our dignity it will run away from us

which basically means “If we don’t salvage our self-respect we’ll lose it” …… something like that.

Haitian Creole ↔ English Reference, Look up Haitian Creole and English Words

Wednesday, March 18, 2015

Center of Hope Haiti School : Science Class



Mandaly says:
Thanks for letting post this video TiWill. I was moved by this video. Learning math, science, or reading comprehension in H. Creole from books that are written in H. Creole is huge positive change for Klas Fondamantal in Haiti. I hope that Haitians and foreigners will take the time to learn more about Center of Hope Haiti School.  

Haitian Creole ↔ English Reference, Look up Haitian Creole and English Words

what does the name Judenalove mean?

I pretty sure this name has sentimental meaning for Judenalove's parents.
It does not mean anything in H. Creole that I know of. It's not and original H. Creole name.

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Tuesday, March 17, 2015

Is kanta..sa vle di " As for" nan anglé? Does "kanta" mean "as for " in english ?

Yes, that's what it stands for.

....kanta pou ti bononm sa a .... - as for this guy
....kanta pou mwen menm ...... - as for me
.....kanta pou sa ..... - as for that


Haitian Creole ↔ English Reference, Look up Haitian Creole and English Words

A friend wrote:.......

A friend wrote:

"Mandaly,

Mèsi anpil pou repons ou a.

Vè 1970/80 mwen te aprann ekri Kreyol la sèvi ak sistenm Pressoir-Faublas.
(Mouin té konn ékri Kréyòl-la konsa.)  Mwen te fèt nan NYC.  M pa janm we peyi
Ayiti.  Mwen te konn volonte nan sant kominite pou ede rèfije yo.  Mwen ansanye
klas otograf Kreyòl la.  Ositou, mwen montre rèfije pale Angle sinmp.

Pa gen
Ayisyen isit di tou.  Gen anpil moun etranjè.  Men majòrite se blan Mèriken ou
byin Èropyen.  Ou pa we nèg nwa souvan.

Gen dè semin, m te vin manm
"Facebook" pou m ta fè konesans Ayisyen.  Madam mwen se Chinwa li ye.  Se pou
rezon sa, m pa t pale Kreyòl depi lontann lontann.

Gen sèlman youn semin, m
te komanse etidye otograp ofisyel (IPN).  M konnen nivo mwen tre ba.  Chak jou m
ap fè ti progre.

Vè 1970/80 m te patisipe nan manifèstasyon pou di gouvman
Mèriken pa ede rejim Duvalier.  Ositou pou klasifye Ayisyen kòm rèfije Kiben yo:
rèfije politik; pa rèfije ekonòmik.  Rejim nan deja gin foto mwen (ak anpil lòt
moun); m pa vle mouri nan Forte Dimanche.  Vè 1980s, mwe travay isit pou militè.
Se isit m fè konesans madam mwen.  Apre mariye li, m pa gen anpil kontak ak
kominite Ayisyen.

Se sa ki istwa mwen.
"

Mandaly says:

Istwa  w sanble ak istwa yon moun ki egzile lwen ras li men, malgre tout,  mwen wè ou fè anpil zefò pou patisipe nan kominite Ayisyen an kit yo te Nouyòk (New York), Ayiti (Haiti) oubyen sou entènèt la.  Mwen etone tande ou pako janm mete pye Ayiti. Ou pale bon Kreyòl la. Konpliman.    .....Sanble lonbrit te antere Ayiti :)
Wi sa te toujou fè kè m mal lè Meriken te konn Akeyi Kiben enpi yo voye Ayisyen tounen lakay yo paske yo di se pou GRANGOU yo t'ap kouri.   Mwen te toujou panse, "Wi, se pou grangou yo t'ap kouri. Yo pa prizonye politik. MEN .... SE PWOBLEM POLITIK PEYI A KI TE LAKOZ DEZOLASYON EKONOMIK LA. Donk, men jan ak Kiben yo se pwoblèm politik ki t'ap fè nou kite peyi nou  tou."   Antouka......

Mwen apresye kòmantè ou. Kontinye konsa. M'espere tande w ankò.
Yon gwo kout chapo bay tout fanmi ou kote ou ye a.

Haitian Creole ↔ English Reference, Look up Haitian Creole and English Words

Do Haitians say "je t'aime" between family members, or is it only romantic?

Yes they say both "je t'aime" or "mwen renmen w", and it's not always just to express romantic interest.

Haitian Creole ↔ English Reference, Look up Haitian Creole and English Words

If a Haitian guy texts a Haitian girl and calls her "bebe", does that indicate that they are a couple? Thanks.

Monday, March 16, 2015

Men pwoblèm mwen. Se Ayisyen mwen ye. M gin 56 an. Gen plis 30 an m pa t pale Kreyòl la. Kounyeya m rete nan lachin. Pa gen oken Ayisyen nan peyi isit. Men m vle pale lang mwen ankò. Ki jan pou m jwenn "language exchange"? Ki kote m ka jwenn Ayisyen ki vle aprann pale Chinoua ou byen Angle? Nou ka itilize Facetime, Skype, ... pou koze. Mèsi anpil!

Dapre jan w ekri Kreyòl, sanble ou te fè yon ti etidye lang nan.
Gen anpil chanjman ki fèt nan lang nan depi 30 lane sa a. Men sanble ou kenbe konpa w ak Kreyòl la.  Konpliman, kenbe la piga w lage.

Mwen poko jwenn yon "language exchange" pou Ayisyen kominike ak lòt Ayisyen nan bi pou kenbe Kreyòl yo sou konpa. Si w bezwen kominike ak Aysisyen ou va jwenn yo nan "chat room" sou entènèt la oubyen nan "meetup" ki fèt anpèsonn.

Eske ou te janm tounen vizite peyi w pandan trant lane sa yo?

Haitian Creole ↔ English Reference, Look up Haitian Creole and English Words

Si mwen di nan tan bembo kisa ou va di?

Si w ta di m "nan tan benbo", mwen ta di "nan tan lontan", "nan tan dantan", "depi dikdantan", "gen bèl driv", "lò konkonm ta goumen ak berejèn" ....jouk nostalji ta anpare m :)

Haitian Creole ↔ English Reference, Look up Haitian Creole and English Words

Hi, do you have the words to this song, JESUS LAVEM, LI DELIVER M, LI ETYEM MANBA PECHE. I hope I got the words right. mesi

W ape mande m pouki nou kontan konsa
Nou kontan vre paske nou genyen Jezi
Se yon zanmi ki p ape janm bliye nou
Nan ladetrès, nan maladi, nan ladoulè

Jezi lave'm, li delivre m
Li retire m anba vye peche kote mwen te ye

Mèbyeneme annou chante pou Jezi
Lajenès annou louwe Letènèl
Mèfrè ze sè annou pa dekouraje
An nou kenbe fèm jouk Jezi vini n ap kenbe lafwa

Jezi bon
Mwen santi l nan nanm mwen
Mwen santi l nan tout kò mwen
........

Haitian Creole ↔ English Reference, Look up Haitian Creole and English Words

What''s the difference between moin and mwen? Are the used in different part of the country?

Would you use the word ‘chichado’ for someone who does a favor for favor, asks for something in return when he does a favor? Thanks

I would call it regadan.


chichadò means ungenerous, stingy

Haitian Creole ↔ English Reference, Look up Haitian Creole and English Words

Tuesday, March 10, 2015

Silvouple madam ban moin enfomasyon sou ricin a friend gave to me to use as laxative , she calls it mesquiti,but i thought these seeds were dangerous how do you prepare it

It's called maskreti or maskriti.
If you've never prepared this plant before you should stay away from it. If you're in a country other than Haiti there are plenty of cheap laxatives in drugstores. If you're in Haiti and have no drugstores (fanmasi) nearby find a doctor or a medicine man (doktè fèy). If you're not sure of how to take it don't use it - I know I wouldn't

Haitian Creole ↔ English Reference, Look up Haitian Creole and English Words

Kisa djougan vle di enpitou kijan mwen kapab mo sa a?

djougan onswa dyougan

Mwen wè Ayisyen itilize mo sa a de fason. Yon fason li dekri yon moun ki maton, ki fò nan yon bagay, oubyen ki gen bon ti abilite pwofesyonèl nan yon bagay.  Yon lòt fason yo itilize l pou dekri yon moun ki plen enèji, ki “fougueux” jan Franse yo di a.


Nan lang Angle li tradui vivacious, spirited, full of energy, oubyen tou skilled.

Haitian Creole ↔ English Reference, Look up Haitian Creole and English Words

Monday, March 9, 2015

Aprann òtograf Kreyòl la.

Thank you Mr. Degraff for this link.
Here's a a link to an in-depth look at the Haitian Creole orthography:
Aprann òtograph Kreyòl la
The link address is: http://on.fb.me/1zyovCk
You may also click on the picture to see this little booklet.

 Ann Aprann òtograf Kreyòl la


Haitian Creole ↔ English Reference, Look up Haitian Creole and English Words

Kilès ki gen rezon? Who's right?





Listening exercise. Click on the play button and follow along :)


O Ti Mari ou rantre bonè jodi a.
Ti Mari you're home early today.

Men wi. Mwen fatige. M pral kouche pou yon moman.
Yes I'm tired. I'm going to lie down for a while.

What's wrong?

Nothing's wrong.

Cheri m konnen w trè byen. Sa’w genyen? Poukisa figi w fennen konsa?
Sweetie I know you very well. What's wrong? Why the sad face?

A! Se pa anyen ditou.  M pa gen anyen.  M'anfòm.
It's nothing at all. Nothing's wrong. I'm fine.

Ou di w anfòm men figi w pa sanble sa.  Pale avè m non.
You say you're fine but your face doesn't look it. Talk to me won't you?

Dakò. Te’m rakonte w sa’k pase m. Di m kilès ki gen rezon.
Ok. Let me tell you what happened to me. Tell me who's right.

M’ap koute w.
I'm listening.

Jodi a nan travay la nou te genyen yon miting.
Today at work we had a meeting.

Anhan.

Bòs mwen t’ap fè yon prezantasyon an Kreyòl enpi yon anplwaye etranje  ki te la panche bò zòrèy mwen pou mande m tradui sa bòs la t’ap di a. Sa’w kwè m fè?
My boss was making a presentation in Creole and a foreign employee that was there leaned in my ear to ask me to translate what the boss was saying. What do you think I did?

Ou te ede anplwaye a?
You helped the employee?

Men wi . Mwen tradui sa bòs mwen an t’ap di a.  Sa w kwè k rive?
Yes. I translated what my boss was saying. What do you think happened?

Bòs la mande w fè silans,
He told you to be quiet?

O o men wi! – Se kòmsi w te la.  Bòs la fè m yon sèl malonèt devan tout moun – li di m pe bouch mwen.  Mwen vin santi m tankou yon timoun yo rale zorèy li.
Yes! it's as if you were there. He insulted me in front of everyone. He told me to shut up. I felt like a reprimanded child.

Bòs ou an  gen rezon wi cheri. Ou pa ka pale pandan l’ap pale tou – si tout moun ap pale, pa gen moun k’ap koute. Se youn oubyen lòt. Ouswa w’ap pale ouswa w’ap koute. Ou pa ka fè toulede alafwa.
Your boss is right sweetie, you can't talk while he's talking. If everyone is talking no one is listening. It's one or the other. Either you're talking or listening. You can't do both at the same time.

O o sou bò ki moun ou ye menm?
Whose side are you on?

Mwen sou bò w cheri – men eske ou ta renmen gen yon odyans k’ap pale pandan w’ap fè yon prezantasyon?
I'm on your side sweetie. But would you like to have an audience talking while you're doing a presentation?

Non men fò’w konprann sa’ m t’ap fè a te enpòtan tou.
No but you must understand that what I was doing was also important.

Menm si sa, pa fè yon lòt sa w pa ta renmen yo fè w. Ou konnen sa trè byen.
Even then, "Don't do unto others, what you wouldn't want done unto you". You know that very well.

Bon kòm mwen wè se kritike ou vle kritike m jodi a, mwen pral kouche kouche m. Ou mèt kouche sou sofa a aswè a.
Since I realize that all you want to to is to criticize me today, I'm going to lie down. You may lie down on the couch tonight.

O o Cheri! Mwen te fè erè. Se ou ki gen rezon.  Se ou ki va toujou gen rezon.
Oh Sweetie! I was wrong. You were right. You will always be right.

A! li twò ta pou chanje lide.  Pase bòn nwi sou sofa a.
It’s too late to change your mind. Have a good night on the couch.



Haitian Creole ↔ English Reference, Look up Haitian Creole and English Words

Sa ou te kwè a se pa sa

Sa ou te kwè a se pa sa.
You were wrong.

Sa ou kwè sa a ye?
What do you believe this is?
What do you think this is?

Sa w kwè ki pase la a?
What do you believe happened here?

Sa  kwè li fè?
What do you think she did?

Sa w kwè k te rive (contraction)
or
Sa ou kwè ki te rive?
or
Kisa ou kwè ki te rive?
What do think happened?

Sa w kwè li te di m?
What do you think he told me?

Haitian Creole ↔ English Reference, Look up Haitian Creole and English Words

Genyen rezon, gen rezon

gen rezon - to be right, to be correct, to be at an advantage

Ou gen rezon
You are right.

Kilès ki gen rezon e kilès ki pa gen rezon?
Who's right and who's wrong?

Ravèt pa gen rezon devan poul.
Roaches are at a disadvantage when facing chickens.

Se mwen ki gen rezon.
I'm the one who's right.

Li gen rezon devan w.
He's got a leg up on you.

Ou pa fè respè w, se pousa ou p'ap janm gen rezon devan bèlmè w.
You don't respect yourself, that's why you'll never have the upper hand when dealing with your mother in law.

Haitian Creole ↔ English Reference, Look up Haitian Creole and English Words

Do Haïtians from Port-au-Prince completely understand everything that a Haïtian from the north or south of Haïti is saying? Will it be difficult for them to understand their accent and words?

Men wi! tout Ayisyen kèlkeswa kote yo sòti, nan Lès, Lwès, Nò oubyen Sid Dayiti va konprann Kreyòl ki pale  .....depi se Kreyòl Ayisyen l ye. Aksan moun nan Nò oubyen nan Sid p'ap anpeche w swiv yon konvèsasyon nonplis. Gen de twa mo vokabilè ki ka pa menm nan Nò ak nan Sid - donk si w tande yon mo ou pa konprann pran plis enfòmasyon sou mo a.
Absolutely! All Haitians whatever their origin, East, West, North of South of Haiti, will understand spoken Creole ...as long as it is Haitian Creole. Northern or southern Haitian Creole accents won't prevent you from following a conversation. Some vocabulary words may not be the same in the North and South, so ask about these words if you hear them.

Haitian Creole ↔ English Reference, Look up Haitian Creole and English Words

Sunday, March 8, 2015

Can you post the lyrics for Freedom manman song . i cant find it anywhere thanks.

Solèy leve m di Bondye mèsi ke w egziste
Pa gen anyen p’ap fè pou ou
M pa konn fè nwa,
Se sèl nan zye w m wè limyè ka klere
Pa gen anyen m p’ap fè pou ou
Lè kè m fè m mal  tout penn efase lè w vin bò kote  m
Pa gen anyen p’ap fè pou ou

 Nan lavi sa se ou ki lespwa m
Sèl moun ki ka vrèman ban m jwa
Enpi ou fè powblèm vin tounen yon bon paradi
Lè m wè manman m chagren pati
Ou te ban m fòs lè m santi m pa t vle kontinye
Enspirasyon pouse w
Se gras a ou ki fè m pa t janm sispann lite
Ou se cham  ki klere m

Tout sa ke m fè ou sipote m
Depi m piti se lamou pa w ki gide m
M’ekri mizik sa a pou konprann laverite
San ou m sati m debousole
San ou m santi m fòs kè m bese
Pa gen lanmè m p’ap travèse
Pou mwen ede w si ou rele



Haitian Creole ↔ English Reference, Look up Haitian Creole and English Words

Saturday, March 7, 2015

I have a a translation for gentle as DOU. will this work if i try to say 'he was very gentle with me'. thanks and welcome back.

It depends on what he 'performed' so gently.
Li te trè dou avè m.
Li te aji avèk anpil souplès avè m.

Haitian Creole ↔ English Reference, Look up Haitian Creole and English Words

Hi! Can you please help me find the lyrics to this song?? "Jezu pwoblem yo nan men ou. Pwoblem spiritual pwoblem sentimental, pwoblem material yo tout yo nan men ou". The spelling might be wayyyy off lol. Please help me. Thank you!

You were not that far off :)


Si nou sonje lè nou te nan lemonn nou te nan esklavaj
Nou pa’t genyen espwa. Nou te tankou yon brebi egare
Ki pa’t gen patiraj, dyab la te mennen nou nan tout sa ki pa bon
Men Jezi nan amou l,  te vin mouri pou nou, e li te rachte nou anba malediksyon
Jodi a m’ap chante,  se pa pou n pale m mal, paske li delivre nanm mwen anba peche

Si nou genyen pwoblèm pandan m’ap chante la
Leve men nou anlè, pwoblèm yo va rezoud, jezi
Jezi, pwoblèm yo nan men ou Bis, one line)

Lemonn alèz yo di yo san pwoblèm
Men yo tout pè mouri, paske vi yo pa pwòp
Nou menm kretyen nou konn gen ti pwoblèm
Men nou pa pè anyen paske Bondye nou an se matematisyen
Se li k kreye lemonn ak tout sa ki ladan l –
Tè a avèk syèl, se nan men li yo ye
Li konn geri malad, li kon rezoud pwoblèm
nou pa ka konpare grandè Bondye nou an

si nou genyen lafwa nou mèt desann men nou
O non de Jezi pwoblèm yo deja rezoud
gen moun ki san manman
gen moun ki san papa
se ofelen yo ye, yo tout yo nan men ou

Jezi, Jezi! Jezi, pwoblèm yo nan men ou
Pwoblèm espirityèl pwoblèm santimantal,
pwoblèm materyèl yo tout yo nan men ou

Jezi, Jezi, Jezi pwoblèm yo nan men ou

Haitian Creole ↔ English Reference, Look up Haitian Creole and English Words