Bonjou! Learn to Speak Haitian Creole

Bonjou! ...Mèsi! ...E Orevwa! Check out the Audio Lesson of the Week. Do as many exercises as you need. Take an online QUIZ and get your answers right away. Finish a crossword puzzle. Reinforce your learning with the Audio/Video exercises. Search for English or Haitian Creole words translation. Also search the whole site for expressions, idioms and grammar rules. And ask questions about the language in the ASK ME ANYTHING section.
Most requested translations added here for your convenience: I love you → Mwen renmen w. I miss you → Mwen sonje w. My love!Lanmou mwen!

Thursday, March 26, 2015

.... Would "lari blanch" indicate a path covered in snow?

Maybe. It depends on the context.

Lari a tou blanch.
The street is deserted.

Lari tou blan ak lanèj
The street is covered in snow.

One of the meaning of 'blanch' in Haitian Creole is vacancy, lack of (something) or desertedness:

Bay teren an blanch.
Bay kay la blanch
to leave

pase yon nuit blanch
to have a sleepless night


Haitian Creole ↔ English Reference, Look up Haitian Creole and English Words

Mandi can you help me with this. i'm looking for the translation for the word meaningful and google translate gives me TOUCHE, is that right? I wanted to use to say ...a more meaningful relationship to Jesus. Mèsi anpil

meaningful adj. - konsekan, enpòtan, serye, lojik

a more meaningful relationship with Jesus
yon relasyon ki pi serye avèk Jezi

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Wednesday, March 25, 2015

what is this man saying to me? bondye fem konen neg anba pa jwe pou fanm yo

It says,
"Lord, let me know, man down there don't play around for their women."

(P.S. Your emails keep getting returned to my inbox - even when I do a reply -----not sure why.  Do you have a different email address?)

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Tuesday, March 24, 2015

What does it mean when someone says "pa pale konsa" to me? I understand pa pale means not speaking, but what does it mean when they add "konsa" on the end?

konsa - in this manner, this way, like that, so much, so, in such a way

1. Pa pale konsa.
    Don't talk like that.

2. Pa mache konsa.
    Don't walk like that.

3.  Fè li konsa.
     Do it like that.


4. Poukisa ou fache konsa?
    Why are you so angry?

5. Pouki w atriste konsa?
    Why are you so sad?
   

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Monday, March 23, 2015

Lè yon fanm fè anpil pitit byen enganm anpi youn nan pitit yo soti tou mal eske sa rele kras vant?

'Kras vant' se dènye pitit yon fanm, pafwa, pa't menm espere si l t ap genyen.

Haitian Creole ↔ English Reference, Look up Haitian Creole and English Words

What does kabre?

It's used in sports (soccer),  and means to trick a player while playing a sports game.

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For those who are having trouble with writing Haitian Creole 'accents' or 'foreign characters' on your computer, here's help......

aplikasyon pou aksan fòs la

You know how important these foreign characters are, don't you?
You want to write pòt (door) but you end up writing pot (to bring)
or maybe it takes an average of 5 keystrokes to achieve these: À à È è Ò ò
and you don't want to go through all that.
So here's a trusted link for adding an app on your PC that will make writing the characters easier.
Once you've install the app, all it will take is to press on the corresponding letters twice on your keyboard, and you're there.
You may toggle the ALT + K key to make the app ACTIVE or INACTIVE depending whether you're writing Kreyòl or other languages.
The program produces an audible confirmation of its mode (double BEEP Haiti keyboard; single BEEP USA keyboard). 
A Haitian flag icon is added if you wish to use it as the icon for the app.

This app comes to you compliment of Guyto Bichotte who created it. Thanks Guyto.
Link: https://www.facebook.com/download/810020792417711/AyitiEtaziniKybd.zip 

Would "manman" in "manman lajan" mean "huge pile of money" and in what other ways can you use "manman"?

Manman lajan is a sum of money on which interest may be paid. It's the principal amount (of money).

Haitians us manman as an interjection (and papa too):
Adye manman!
Adye papa!

And they also use it to say big, huge, massive
(They use papa the same way too.)
yon gwo manman kay
yon manman bèf
yon manman kanson
etc...

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How do you say to show-off in Haitian Creole. My translator does not know that word yet. Thanks

to show off - fè chèlbè, fè gran panpan, fè enteresant

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As you know, I am focusing on the official orthography. I want to get to the point....

You said:

As you know, I am focusing on the official
orthography.  I want to get to the point, where I can read words from the way
they are written; not because I already know them.  I want get to the point,
where I can write them; not because I have already seen them.

So, we have the
word "cheve" for hair.  Now, if I am not mistaken the pronunciation is the same
as the French "cheveux".  However, "e" in "cheve" would not seem to rhyme with
the "e" words like "peyi", "kwe", and "vle".  But use of "è" would seem wrong
too, since the syllables in "cheve" don't rhyme with the words "mèt", "fèt", and
"lèt".

And so, I am not sure how the proper pronunciation of "cheve" is
arrived at from the use of this spelling; unless of course, I am mispronouncing
the word as French?

Thanks!

Mandaly says:

Haitians say 'cheve' or 'chive' and it's not pronounced like the French word 'cheveux'
We use the Haitian Creole letter 'e' to say 'cheve'.  Remember that the french sound 'eux' does not exist in H. Creole.

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Okay, I am going back to beginning 2010, because I think its the best way.....

You said:

Okay, I am going back to beginning 2010,
because I think its the best way to review.

<<<àn pronounced like the
"an"sound in "Liliane" - Please say outloud: bekàn, soutàn, avwàn,
lamàn>>>

Clearly this letter has been dropped from the Official Orthography
with what has it been replaced?

I am thinking maybe
"yen"?

Thanks!

Mandaly says:
The accented 'a' tells us that 'an' and 'àn' are pronounced differently.
Egzanp: pan, pàn, and pann are each pronounced differently. They each have their own meaning too.
 
Haitian Creole ↔ English Reference, Look up Haitian Creole and English Words

Konsènan mo kreyòl yo Ayisyen gen dwa di menm mo a diferan fason. Kijan pou ou konnen kiles ki pi bon? Pa egzanp lè moun nan santi fredi genyen nan yo ki di yo –frèt- tandiske gen lòt ki di yo -fwèt- kilès mo ki pibon?

Se pa yon afè de kilès ki pi bon, se senpleman yon diferans rejyonal nan fason yo di mo yo. Mwen kwè se yon bagay pou respekte. Diferan rejyon nan peyi a ka pwononse, di, oubyen ekri menm konsèp la diferan fason. Nou pa ka rejte sa.

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what does "sa kap fet pino?" mean

It means that 'pino' might be somebody's name

Sa k ap fèt ... 
What's up....?
What's going on ....?

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Thursday, March 19, 2015

What are words for "appeal" and "to appeal" in this context? Here are examples ......

You said:
 "What are words for "appeal" and "to appeal"
in this context? 
Here are examples as a noun, "My lawyer said the court's
decision wasn't correct and that we should file for an appeal." or "their appeal
was denied in the superior court." or "The decision was reversed on appeal."

Here are examples as a verb, "He appealed, arguing that there was not enough
evidence to convict him." or "She lost the case and appealed the following
month." or "We plan to appeal the court's decision." or "The ruling can be
appealed within 30 days." or "The verdict was appealed to a higher court." or
"He was found guilty but appealed immediately."

appeal
apèl

to make an appeal
fè apèl

to appeal against a decision  
fè apèl kont yon desizyon

to appeal against a verdict  
Fè apèl kont yon vèdik

Supreme court
Lakou kasasyon




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Please translate LONG KOU KE PIS

It means narrowly, barely, a hairsbreadth escape

Long kou ke pis machin nan te frape m - The car just barely missed me.


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The Official Alphabet which was approved, I think, in 1979 has letters: "ou" and "w". At times,.....

You said:
"Mandaly,

The Official Alphabet which was approved, I think, in 1979 has
letters:  "ou" and "w".

At times, I have seen the English word "you" written
as "ou" in Creole, and at other times, written as "w".  Also, when I have seen
it written as "w" it is not always in the situation where it might form a spoken
sound contraction (such as "kisa w ap manje?").

So, how should I write, "I
haven't seen you for a while"?

M pa we ou

or

M pa we w

Furthermore,
when we talk about contractions, there are mandatory contractions and optional
contractions.  When should optional contractions be written?

For example:  "I
would like"

Mwen ta renmen ...

or 

M ta renmen ...

Are there any
rules as to when optional contractions should be employed in writing?  (Because
in English unless you are writing in vernacular, you should avoid
contractions.)

Part of what I am asking is should contractions which are
optional be uncontracted and left to the reader only if the passage is being
read out loud?  (As I know the guiding principle is that we write as we
speak/pronounce.)  If I am writing a text book on computer programming in Creole
is there a more formal style in which to write or should I write as if I were
talking to a class?  (This is not a totally hypothetical question, since I have
considered the preparation of educational materials.)

Thank you!

PS:  I am
very excited to see so many Haitians now writing their language.  When I first
learned/taught in the 1970s, it was very much a "chicken and the egg" situation.
If no Haitians could read Creole, then who would be there to read literature and
text books in Creole?  If no Haitians could write Creole, then who would author
our literature and text books.  And so, back around 1970/80, myself, the other
volunteers, and priests who ran the the community center firmly believed the key
to Haiti's future was Creole literacy and broad public education.  I am truly
happy to see that there has been progress."

Mandaly says:

1. 'w' is a short form for 'ou'. (I'm sure you know that)

2. If you see the word 'you', more than likely it's a typo. Autocorrect is awesome but not when you're trying to write another language :)  I actually had to teach my iphone and ipad to "speak" H.Creole so that it would stop correcting my texts and emails.

3. There are a few definite places where you shouldn't use contractions (or fòm kout), otherwise it's pretty much as you wish depending on the setting of the conversation, texts, or written work . Some instructors tell you that it's best to use the long form at the beginning of a sentence but if I want to say 'M ap vini demen' or 'M t ale wè l lopital la' or 'M ale. N a wè pita.' or 'W a gentan konnen' I would be more comfortable using the short form at the beginning of these sentences because that's the way I talk.

4. Some place where you cannot use contractions: after pou, san, sou towards the end of a sentence.
    a. Pote yon ti dlo pou m.
       We should say: Pote yon ti dlo pou mwen.

    b. Dlo enpòtan anpil. Ou pa ka viv san l.
       We should say: Dlo enpòtan anpil. Nou pa ka viv san li.

    c. Kote malèt la? M te mete liv mwen yo sou l men kounye a m pa wè l.
       We should say: Kote malèt la? M te mete liv mwen you sou li men kounye a m pa wè l.

Also consider words that have short forms: konnen, pote, mete, etc....
We don't usually say Mwen pa konn. we say Mwen pa konnen.
Konbyen malèt ou pote? instead of konbyen malèt ou pot?

and also no contractions after consonants:

tèt mwen instead of tèt m 
pitit li instead of pitit l
chemiz mwen instead of chemiz m
Somehow people from North Haiti make these exceptions work :) 
You know.... they say 'tèt m' (tèt anm or tèt an mwen); 'pitit l' (pitit a l or pitit a li); 'chemiz m' (chemiz anm or chemiz an mwen).  Anyways you cannot make this work if you're not from there :)


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how do you pronounce the phrase for "How much". Is it spelled konben or konbyen?

Haitians use these three words konbe, konben or konbyen.

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"Mandaly, I originally posted this in English on Facebook (a general group for Haitians & non-Haitians who want to improve their Creole ...

You said:

Mandaly,

I originally posted this in
English on Facebook (a general group for Haitians & non-Haitians who want to
improve their Creole), but I have yet to receive an answer.  I will keep it in
English, since this is a Web site for everyone to learn Haitian Creole.

I
learned to write in the late 1970's.  At that time, one could say that there was
no standardization for writing Creole, or one could say there were many
competing standards for writing Creole!  One linguistic paper I read said that
as of 1980 there were as many as 11 such standards!

I learned to read/write a
system known as Pressoir-Faublas or Faublas-Pressoir.  I haven't really spoken
Creole for more than 30 years.  But I want to read/write/speak again!  The
current Official System is based on work by the IPN.  So, I am in the process of
learning IPN.  No, longer:  "mouin ékri Kréyòl-la", but "mwen ekri Kreyòl
la".

I have no trouble with the phonemes of IPN.  But I have a lot of
confusion when it comes to punctuation.  Around 1980, I had learned the
following rules for punctuation:

Contractions with a verb:

Mouin ap di li
-> M-ap di-l

Definite articles:

liv la -> liv-la

Possesives:

liv
mouin -> liv-mouin
liv mouin an -> liv-mouin-an

Other contractions
(unknown):

Si ou fè sa -> S'ou fè sa

My confusion with IPN is that I have
seen some orthography documents describing the use of ' and - similar to the
above.  Whereas others saying that you never use "siy sa yo" (these
signs).

So, in the cases above what is the correct Official
Orthography?

When a shortened pronoun like "mwen" appears not as a
contraction, then how is it written?  For example:

Mwen pale Kreyòl. ->  M
pale Kreyòl? M' pale Kreyòl?

I am quite confused.  I have tried looking at
the writing of others, but I do see some variation.  Thus, I am asking what is
official and correct?

By the way, I have no social or political attachment to
any orthography.  Having said that:

* I do feel that the punctation I learned
does make reading easier as word grouping is easier to see and parse out in a
sentence quickly.

* My personal expertise is in computer systems.  If we want
to see computer engines do a better job with machine translation of our
language, then including additional syntactic information to aid the parsing
software is important.  Understanding Creole is highly dependent on word order
and grouping, since there are no conjugations, morphemes, etc...  Thus, it seems
machine translation of Creole is very hit or miss (as they say in Spanish "mas
menos que mas"; more miss than hit).  (BTW, as I know Chinese and it is highly
syntactic like Creole, translation engines also perform extremely poorly on
Chinese, as well.)

Nenpòt sa m te aprann depi lontan lontan; an tout ka, m ta
renmen ekri lang mwen korèk!  :)

Mèsi anpil!"


Mandaly says:

1. We've agreed not to use apostwòf or tirè: 
M pale Kreyòl. 
M ale.
Eske w ap vini demen?
Kite m an repo.
Papa m pa la.
Sa se liv mwen.
Si w fè sa m p ap kontan.

2. The Haitian Creole grammar punctuation follows the French punctuation rule.

3. Here's a link that will prove helpful.  Be sure to check out Dr. Degraff's postscript at the end of the booklet: http://on.fb.me/1zyovCk




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Mandaly, Okay. I cannot help myself! I have yet another question on how to write properly. I was looking at one of .....

Mandaly,

Okay.  I cannot help myself!  I
have yet another question on how to write properly.

I was looking at one of
your answers to me, and you wrote, "Antouka".  I was just writing to you, and I
wrote "an tout ka".

Of course, you know why I did this, because I know (in
the back of my head) that this is at least three separate words in French.  Even
in Creole (if we forget French), "tout" and "ka" both can stand by themselves as
separate words.

My question:  is when are words combined as you have done and
when are words separated when dealing with common
expressions?

Thanks!

Mandaly says:

This word may be written as 'antouka' or 'an tou ka'. So you were not totally off.  A lot of ‘compound’ words or concepts in French may be written as one word in H. Creole. It may be because the parts that make up the whole word or concept are not Haitian Creole words.
Example: Lune de miel –  we may  say lindemyèl or lin de myèl
 Other examples are: tranblemanntè, labib, laviktwa, monkonpè, lakansyèl, dekiprevyen, lafendimonn, alafen, etc….. 

I also wanted to add not to confuse compound French words/concept with compound H. Creole words:

Compound H. Creole words are tèt ansanm, chita tande, pote kole, mayi moulen, lese frape. 
Compound H. Creole words are not written as one string of words, the words are written separately.  

Other compound H. Creole words you write it as one or two words depending on the meaning
I like Dr. Degraff's example: ti fi or tifi?

Li se you ti fi.
Li pa tifi.
'ti fi' and 'tifi' here don't have the same meaning

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Hello! I'm trying to figure out the translation for Dr. Aristide's quote "Si n pa sove diyite n, Diyite n ap sove kite n." Google and Microsoft are not providing a good translation,unfortunately. I'd really appreciate the help!

"Si n pa sove diyite n, Diyite n ap sove kite n." 

In this quote, the first “sove” means to defend, to salvage, to save.

The second “sove”  means to run away, or to flee

Diyite”, of course, translates dignity or self-respect

sove kite” translates to run away from..... literally to run away and leave.  
Egzanp: Li sove kite mHe ran away and left me.

So literally, the quote says “If we don’t defend our dignity it will run away from us

which basically means “If we don’t salvage our self-respect we’ll lose it” …… something like that.

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Wednesday, March 18, 2015

Center of Hope Haiti School : Science Class



Mandaly says:
Thanks for letting post this video TiWill. I was moved by this video. Learning math, science, or reading comprehension in H. Creole from books that are written in H. Creole is huge positive change for Klas Fondamantal in Haiti. I hope that Haitians and foreigners will take the time to learn more about Center of Hope Haiti School.  

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what does the name Judenalove mean?

I pretty sure this name has sentimental meaning for Judenalove's parents.
It does not mean anything in H. Creole that I know of. It's not and original H. Creole name.

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Tuesday, March 17, 2015

Is kanta..sa vle di " As for" nan anglé? Does "kanta" mean "as for " in english ?

Yes, that's what it stands for.

....kanta pou ti bononm sa a .... - as for this guy
....kanta pou mwen menm ...... - as for me
.....kanta pou sa ..... - as for that


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A friend wrote:.......

A friend wrote:

"Mandaly,

Mèsi anpil pou repons ou a.

Vè 1970/80 mwen te aprann ekri Kreyol la sèvi ak sistenm Pressoir-Faublas.
(Mouin té konn ékri Kréyòl-la konsa.)  Mwen te fèt nan NYC.  M pa janm we peyi
Ayiti.  Mwen te konn volonte nan sant kominite pou ede rèfije yo.  Mwen ansanye
klas otograf Kreyòl la.  Ositou, mwen montre rèfije pale Angle sinmp.

Pa gen
Ayisyen isit di tou.  Gen anpil moun etranjè.  Men majòrite se blan Mèriken ou
byin Èropyen.  Ou pa we nèg nwa souvan.

Gen dè semin, m te vin manm
"Facebook" pou m ta fè konesans Ayisyen.  Madam mwen se Chinwa li ye.  Se pou
rezon sa, m pa t pale Kreyòl depi lontann lontann.

Gen sèlman youn semin, m
te komanse etidye otograp ofisyel (IPN).  M konnen nivo mwen tre ba.  Chak jou m
ap fè ti progre.

Vè 1970/80 m te patisipe nan manifèstasyon pou di gouvman
Mèriken pa ede rejim Duvalier.  Ositou pou klasifye Ayisyen kòm rèfije Kiben yo:
rèfije politik; pa rèfije ekonòmik.  Rejim nan deja gin foto mwen (ak anpil lòt
moun); m pa vle mouri nan Forte Dimanche.  Vè 1980s, mwe travay isit pou militè.
Se isit m fè konesans madam mwen.  Apre mariye li, m pa gen anpil kontak ak
kominite Ayisyen.

Se sa ki istwa mwen.
"

Mandaly says:

Istwa  w sanble ak istwa yon moun ki egzile lwen ras li men, malgre tout,  mwen wè ou fè anpil zefò pou patisipe nan kominite Ayisyen an kit yo te Nouyòk (New York), Ayiti (Haiti) oubyen sou entènèt la.  Mwen etone tande ou pako janm mete pye Ayiti. Ou pale bon Kreyòl la. Konpliman.    .....Sanble lonbrit te antere Ayiti :)
Wi sa te toujou fè kè m mal lè Meriken te konn Akeyi Kiben enpi yo voye Ayisyen tounen lakay yo paske yo di se pou GRANGOU yo t'ap kouri.   Mwen te toujou panse, "Wi, se pou grangou yo t'ap kouri. Yo pa prizonye politik. MEN .... SE PWOBLEM POLITIK PEYI A KI TE LAKOZ DEZOLASYON EKONOMIK LA. Donk, men jan ak Kiben yo se pwoblèm politik ki t'ap fè nou kite peyi nou  tou."   Antouka......

Mwen apresye kòmantè ou. Kontinye konsa. M'espere tande w ankò.
Yon gwo kout chapo bay tout fanmi ou kote ou ye a.

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Do Haitians say "je t'aime" between family members, or is it only romantic?

Yes they say both "je t'aime" or "mwen renmen w", and it's not always just to express romantic interest.

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If a Haitian guy texts a Haitian girl and calls her "bebe", does that indicate that they are a couple? Thanks.

Monday, March 16, 2015

Men pwoblèm mwen. Se Ayisyen mwen ye. M gin 56 an. Gen plis 30 an m pa t pale Kreyòl la. Kounyeya m rete nan lachin. Pa gen oken Ayisyen nan peyi isit. Men m vle pale lang mwen ankò. Ki jan pou m jwenn "language exchange"? Ki kote m ka jwenn Ayisyen ki vle aprann pale Chinoua ou byen Angle? Nou ka itilize Facetime, Skype, ... pou koze. Mèsi anpil!

Dapre jan w ekri Kreyòl, sanble ou te fè yon ti etidye lang nan.
Gen anpil chanjman ki fèt nan lang nan depi 30 lane sa a. Men sanble ou kenbe konpa w ak Kreyòl la.  Konpliman, kenbe la piga w lage.

Mwen poko jwenn yon "language exchange" pou Ayisyen kominike ak lòt Ayisyen nan bi pou kenbe Kreyòl yo sou konpa. Si w bezwen kominike ak Aysisyen ou va jwenn yo nan "chat room" sou entènèt la oubyen nan "meetup" ki fèt anpèsonn.

Eske ou te janm tounen vizite peyi w pandan trant lane sa yo?

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Si mwen di nan tan bembo kisa ou va di?

Si w ta di m "nan tan benbo", mwen ta di "nan tan lontan", "nan tan dantan", "depi dikdantan", "gen bèl driv", "lò konkonm ta goumen ak berejèn" ....jouk nostalji ta anpare m :)

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Hi, do you have the words to this song, JESUS LAVEM, LI DELIVER M, LI ETYEM MANBA PECHE. I hope I got the words right. mesi

W ape mande m pouki nou kontan konsa
Nou kontan vre paske nou genyen Jezi
Se yon zanmi ki p ape janm bliye nou
Nan ladetrès, nan maladi, nan ladoulè

Jezi lave'm, li delivre m
Li retire m anba vye peche kote mwen te ye

Mèbyeneme annou chante pou Jezi
Lajenès annou louwe Letènèl
Mèfrè ze sè annou pa dekouraje
An nou kenbe fèm jouk Jezi vini n ap kenbe lafwa

Jezi bon
Mwen santi l nan nanm mwen
Mwen santi l nan tout kò mwen
........

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What''s the difference between moin and mwen? Are the used in different part of the country?

Would you use the word ‘chichado’ for someone who does a favor for favor, asks for something in return when he does a favor? Thanks

I would call it regadan.


chichadò means ungenerous, stingy

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Tuesday, March 10, 2015

Silvouple madam ban moin enfomasyon sou ricin a friend gave to me to use as laxative , she calls it mesquiti,but i thought these seeds were dangerous how do you prepare it

It's called maskreti or maskriti.
If you've never prepared this plant before you should stay away from it. If you're in a country other than Haiti there are plenty of cheap laxatives in drugstores. If you're in Haiti and have no drugstores (fanmasi) nearby find a doctor or a medicine man (doktè fèy). If you're not sure of how to take it don't use it - I know I wouldn't

Haitian Creole ↔ English Reference, Look up Haitian Creole and English Words

Kisa djougan vle di enpitou kijan mwen kapab mo sa a?

djougan onswa dyougan

Mwen wè Ayisyen itilize mo sa a de fason. Yon fason li dekri yon moun ki maton, ki fò nan yon bagay, oubyen ki gen bon ti abilite pwofesyonèl nan yon bagay.  Yon lòt fason yo itilize l pou dekri yon moun ki plen enèji, ki “fougueux” jan Franse yo di a.


Nan lang Angle li tradui vivacious, spirited, full of energy, oubyen tou skilled.

Haitian Creole ↔ English Reference, Look up Haitian Creole and English Words

Monday, March 9, 2015

Aprann òtograf Kreyòl la.

Thank you Mr. Degraff for this link.
Here's a a link to an in-depth look at the Haitian Creole orthography:
Aprann òtograph Kreyòl la
The link address is: http://on.fb.me/1zyovCk
You may also click on the picture to see this little booklet.

 Ann Aprann òtograf Kreyòl la


Haitian Creole ↔ English Reference, Look up Haitian Creole and English Words

Kilès ki gen rezon? Who's right?





Listening exercise. Click on the play button and follow along :)


O Ti Mari ou rantre bonè jodi a.
Ti Mari you're home early today.

Men wi. Mwen fatige. M pral kouche pou yon moman.
Yes I'm tired. I'm going to lie down for a while.

What's wrong?

Nothing's wrong.

Cheri m konnen w trè byen. Sa’w genyen? Poukisa figi w fennen konsa?
Sweetie I know you very well. What's wrong? Why the sad face?

A! Se pa anyen ditou.  M pa gen anyen.  M'anfòm.
It's nothing at all. Nothing's wrong. I'm fine.

Ou di w anfòm men figi w pa sanble sa.  Pale avè m non.
You say you're fine but your face doesn't look it. Talk to me won't you?

Dakò. Te’m rakonte w sa’k pase m. Di m kilès ki gen rezon.
Ok. Let me tell you what happened to me. Tell me who's right.

M’ap koute w.
I'm listening.

Jodi a nan travay la nou te genyen yon miting.
Today at work we had a meeting.

Anhan.

Bòs mwen t’ap fè yon prezantasyon an Kreyòl enpi yon anplwaye etranje  ki te la panche bò zòrèy mwen pou mande m tradui sa bòs la t’ap di a. Sa’w kwè m fè?
My boss was making a presentation in Creole and a foreign employee that was there leaned in my ear to ask me to translate what the boss was saying. What do you think I did?

Ou te ede anplwaye a?
You helped the employee?

Men wi . Mwen tradui sa bòs mwen an t’ap di a.  Sa w kwè k rive?
Yes. I translated what my boss was saying. What do you think happened?

Bòs la mande w fè silans,
He told you to be quiet?

O o men wi! – Se kòmsi w te la.  Bòs la fè m yon sèl malonèt devan tout moun – li di m pe bouch mwen.  Mwen vin santi m tankou yon timoun yo rale zorèy li.
Yes! it's as if you were there. He insulted me in front of everyone. He told me to shut up. I felt like a reprimanded child.

Bòs ou an  gen rezon wi cheri. Ou pa ka pale pandan l’ap pale tou – si tout moun ap pale, pa gen moun k’ap koute. Se youn oubyen lòt. Ouswa w’ap pale ouswa w’ap koute. Ou pa ka fè toulede alafwa.
Your boss is right sweetie, you can't talk while he's talking. If everyone is talking no one is listening. It's one or the other. Either you're talking or listening. You can't do both at the same time.

O o sou bò ki moun ou ye menm?
Whose side are you on?

Mwen sou bò w cheri – men eske ou ta renmen gen yon odyans k’ap pale pandan w’ap fè yon prezantasyon?
I'm on your side sweetie. But would you like to have an audience talking while you're doing a presentation?

Non men fò’w konprann sa’ m t’ap fè a te enpòtan tou.
No but you must understand that what I was doing was also important.

Menm si sa, pa fè yon lòt sa w pa ta renmen yo fè w. Ou konnen sa trè byen.
Even then, "Don't do unto others, what you wouldn't want done unto you". You know that very well.

Bon kòm mwen wè se kritike ou vle kritike m jodi a, mwen pral kouche kouche m. Ou mèt kouche sou sofa a aswè a.
Since I realize that all you want to to is to criticize me today, I'm going to lie down. You may lie down on the couch tonight.

O o Cheri! Mwen te fè erè. Se ou ki gen rezon.  Se ou ki va toujou gen rezon.
Oh Sweetie! I was wrong. You were right. You will always be right.

A! li twò ta pou chanje lide.  Pase bòn nwi sou sofa a.
It’s too late to change your mind. Have a good night on the couch.



Haitian Creole ↔ English Reference, Look up Haitian Creole and English Words

Sa ou te kwè a se pa sa

Sa ou te kwè a se pa sa.
You were wrong.

Sa ou kwè sa a ye?
What do you believe this is?
What do you think this is?

Sa w kwè ki pase la a?
What do you believe happened here?

Sa  kwè li fè?
What do you think she did?

Sa w kwè k te rive (contraction)
or
Sa ou kwè ki te rive?
or
Kisa ou kwè ki te rive?
What do think happened?

Sa w kwè li te di m?
What do you think he told me?

Haitian Creole ↔ English Reference, Look up Haitian Creole and English Words

Genyen rezon, gen rezon

gen rezon - to be right, to be correct, to be at an advantage

Ou gen rezon
You are right.

Kilès ki gen rezon e kilès ki pa gen rezon?
Who's right and who's wrong?

Ravèt pa gen rezon devan poul.
Roaches are at a disadvantage when facing chickens.

Se mwen ki gen rezon.
I'm the one who's right.

Li gen rezon devan w.
He's got a leg up on you.

Ou pa fè respè w, se pousa ou p'ap janm gen rezon devan bèlmè w.
You don't respect yourself, that's why you'll never have the upper hand when dealing with your mother in law.

Haitian Creole ↔ English Reference, Look up Haitian Creole and English Words

Do Haïtians from Port-au-Prince completely understand everything that a Haïtian from the north or south of Haïti is saying? Will it be difficult for them to understand their accent and words?

Men wi! tout Ayisyen kèlkeswa kote yo sòti, nan Lès, Lwès, Nò oubyen Sid Dayiti va konprann Kreyòl ki pale  .....depi se Kreyòl Ayisyen l ye. Aksan moun nan Nò oubyen nan Sid p'ap anpeche w swiv yon konvèsasyon nonplis. Gen de twa mo vokabilè ki ka pa menm nan Nò ak nan Sid - donk si w tande yon mo ou pa konprann pran plis enfòmasyon sou mo a.
Absolutely! All Haitians whatever their origin, East, West, North of South of Haiti, will understand spoken Creole ...as long as it is Haitian Creole. Northern or southern Haitian Creole accents won't prevent you from following a conversation. Some vocabulary words may not be the same in the North and South, so ask about these words if you hear them.

Haitian Creole ↔ English Reference, Look up Haitian Creole and English Words

Sunday, March 8, 2015

Can you post the lyrics for Freedom manman song . i cant find it anywhere thanks.

Solèy leve m di Bondye mèsi ke w egziste
Pa gen anyen p’ap fè pou ou
M pa konn fè nwa,
Se sèl nan zye w m wè limyè ka klere
Pa gen anyen m p’ap fè pou ou
Lè kè m fè m mal  tout penn efase lè w vin bò kote  m
Pa gen anyen p’ap fè pou ou

 Nan lavi sa se ou ki lespwa m
Sèl moun ki ka vrèman ban m jwa
Enpi ou fè powblèm vin tounen yon bon paradi
Lè m wè manman m chagren pati
Ou te ban m fòs lè m santi m pa t vle kontinye
Enspirasyon pouse w
Se gras a ou ki fè m pa t janm sispann lite
Ou se cham  ki klere m

Tout sa ke m fè ou sipote m
Depi m piti se lamou pa w ki gide m
M’ekri mizik sa a pou konprann laverite
San ou m sati m debousole
San ou m santi m fòs kè m bese
Pa gen lanmè m p’ap travèse
Pou mwen ede w si ou rele



Haitian Creole ↔ English Reference, Look up Haitian Creole and English Words

Saturday, March 7, 2015

I have a a translation for gentle as DOU. will this work if i try to say 'he was very gentle with me'. thanks and welcome back.

It depends on what he 'performed' so gently.
Li te trè dou avè m.
Li te aji avèk anpil souplès avè m.

Haitian Creole ↔ English Reference, Look up Haitian Creole and English Words

Hi! Can you please help me find the lyrics to this song?? "Jezu pwoblem yo nan men ou. Pwoblem spiritual pwoblem sentimental, pwoblem material yo tout yo nan men ou". The spelling might be wayyyy off lol. Please help me. Thank you!

You were not that far off :)


Si nou sonje lè nou te nan lemonn nou te nan esklavaj
Nou pa’t genyen espwa. Nou te tankou yon brebi egare
Ki pa’t gen patiraj, dyab la te mennen nou nan tout sa ki pa bon
Men Jezi nan amou l,  te vin mouri pou nou, e li te rachte nou anba malediksyon
Jodi a m’ap chante,  se pa pou n pale m mal, paske li delivre nanm mwen anba peche

Si nou genyen pwoblèm pandan m’ap chante la
Leve men nou anlè, pwoblèm yo va rezoud, jezi
Jezi, pwoblèm yo nan men ou Bis, one line)

Lemonn alèz yo di yo san pwoblèm
Men yo tout pè mouri, paske vi yo pa pwòp
Nou menm kretyen nou konn gen ti pwoblèm
Men nou pa pè anyen paske Bondye nou an se matematisyen
Se li k kreye lemonn ak tout sa ki ladan l –
Tè a avèk syèl, se nan men li yo ye
Li konn geri malad, li kon rezoud pwoblèm
nou pa ka konpare grandè Bondye nou an

si nou genyen lafwa nou mèt desann men nou
O non de Jezi pwoblèm yo deja rezoud
gen moun ki san manman
gen moun ki san papa
se ofelen yo ye, yo tout yo nan men ou

Jezi, Jezi! Jezi, pwoblèm yo nan men ou
Pwoblèm espirityèl pwoblèm santimantal,
pwoblèm materyèl yo tout yo nan men ou

Jezi, Jezi, Jezi pwoblèm yo nan men ou

Haitian Creole ↔ English Reference, Look up Haitian Creole and English Words

Friday, March 6, 2015

How can I say in Haitian creole ."De la detresse a l'esperance".

Detresse detrès, touman, chagren
Esperance lesperans

de la detresse a l'esperance

sot nan detrès pou mennen nan lesperans

Haitian Creole ↔ English Reference, Look up Haitian Creole and English Words

Faith is Strength - in Haitian Creole please foi se fos?

You are very welcome. It is our pleasure.(in creole sivouple :)

You're welcome
deryen
padekwa

It's our pleasure.
Se tout plezi nou.

Haitian Creole ↔ English Reference, Look up Haitian Creole and English Words

I'm wondering if you could help me find this song yon jou m va rejui avek Jesus kris Nan yon bel cite lajwa ap nouye. And there's another one it goes like this lavi ap mennew tankou yon ti bato

Zanmi k’ap koute
Ki pa konvèti
Sa se yon ti chan m’ap chante pou ou
Si ou pa prese fè yon ti chita
Pou w kapab tande
Si mwen ta mande w ki jou ou te fèt
,Ou prêt pou reponn se tèl jou ou tèl dat
Alo zanmi mwen mwen ta renmen mande w se konbyen ou rete


Lavi ap mennen w tankou yon ti bato
Ou pa konn ki bò l’ap rive avè w
Asepte Jezi paske se li menm sèl ki kapab delivre w
Ou genyen 22, 23 ou 24 an
Ou kap gen 40, 50 ou 60 an
Alò zanmi mwen mwen ta renmen ou di’m konbyen tan ou rete


Chak fwa ou rete ou di w’a gen tan
Kòm si lavi a te depann de ou
Alò zanmi mwen, mwen ta renmen ou di m konbyen tan ou rete
Chak jou ou leve ou ta dwe priye
Renmèsye Bondye pou sa l fè pou ou
Li menm ki sove w
Li sitèlman renmen

Li bay vi li pou ou

Haitian Creole ↔ English Reference, Look up Haitian Creole and English Words

Hi Mandaly! I've been missing your posts so much. One question. You know how in a lot of Haitian konpa songs, the singers said "zobodo" a lot? Well, what does it mean? Just curious. Thanks!

...zobodo bodo...pepa...papade..."
They are Lyric fillers.

Haitian Creole ↔ English Reference, Look up Haitian Creole and English Words

Thursday, March 5, 2015

Hi ! I looking for a song ! Can you help me please! Batay la se pou le Seigneur Pouki sa wap kraze ko-uo. Batay la se pou le Seigneur rete en silence .ou te met essaye jodia se pa anyien wap regle pito ou lague batay la nan main l'Eternel .please, Thanks!

Batay la se pou Letènèl pouki sa wap kraze kò'w? 
Batay la se pou L'etènèl rete an silans. 
Ou mèt eseye depi jodi pou rive demen se pa anyen w'ap regle 
Pito'w lage batay la nan men Letènèl


Izrayèl te devan lanmè wouj
Farawon dèyè l, l'ap mache al rankontre l
Kijan pou yo fè?  Ki moun ki kab delivre yo?
Te gen yon men envizib ki t'ap gide Moyiz avèk pèp Izrayèl la
Touswit Letènèl pale, se te delivrans.


Amalèk parèt sou Izrayèl pase pa dèyè'l atake'l ak gwoup li yo
Moyiz monte sou montay, moun yo te desann al batay
Amalèk pa't kapab reziste chak fwa Moyiz leve men'l anlè bay Bondye
Viktwa batay la te la nan men Letènèl.


Sayil pa't kab sipòte David paske Bondye te chwazi'l pou'l t'al ranplase'l
David pran lafuit, Sayil dèyè'l pou touye'l
David epanye lavi Sayil pandan'l t'ap dòmi
Li pa't mete men sou li.
Sayil mouri, Letènèl te delivre David


Anpil fwa Kretyen yo konn panse se yo menm ki kapab mennen batay la.
Se sa ki fè pafwa yo konn pèdi batay la
Aprann lage batay la nan men Letènèl
Se li menm ki konnen sa l'ap fè
Bay Letènèl batay la, w'a gen laviktwa



Haitian Creole ↔ English Reference, Look up Haitian Creole and English Words

Wednesday, March 4, 2015

This is interesting as I noticed when I lived in Haiti that there is often a pretty wide variation in pronunciation because of location, class, and the casualness of....

Anonymous says:
"This is interesting as I noticed when I lived in Haiti that there is often a pretty wide variation in pronunciation because of location, class, and the casualness of conversation, not to mention the natural shift in pronunciation over time. Take for example the word 'bagay.' in my experience the 'g' is dropped more often than not. But it is never spelled 'baay.' Sometimes the first vowel is dropped, too, so that it is pronounced 'bay.' For example, 'ou wè bay la m fenk achte?' Do you think that we are starting to see a drift between written and spoken Creole, where written Creole isn't actually purely phonetic? "

Mandaly says: We'll see. time will tell.

The same thing happens to 'janm" where some Haitians drop the "j" and it sounds like an "h"
Kote w ye m pa janm wè w konsa?

This also happens to the g in  "gason"
Kote ti gason sa a prale?

etc...

Haitian Creole ↔ English Reference, Look up Haitian Creole and English Words

Kisa ki pi senp m ka fe pou yon moun kite'm viv an pè?

Dapre eksperyans mwen, pa gen anyen ou ka fè ki va chanje anyen - si se pou moun w'ap fè li.
Kèlkeswa sa w fè a w'ap toujou echwe depi se pou satisfaksyon moun w'ap fè l.
Fè tèt ou kontan se bagay ki pi senp ou te kapab fè.

Haitian Creole ↔ English Reference, Look up Haitian Creole and English Words

Haiti is not francophone. Haiti is Haitian(-Creole)ophone. This is something to be proud of,.....

"Haiti is not francophone. Haiti is Haitian(-Creole)ophone. This is something to be proud of, a testimony of the creativity and intellect of Haiti's ancestors - a group of people from different linguistic communities, forced together and enslaved, who created a new language to intercommunicate and eventually liberate themselves. 

Haiti and the international community's dealings with Haiti will be much better off once this is understood and celebrated. 

I have just spent several months in France, and honestly, I think Haiti is as francophone as France is anglophone. 

Yes, most people in France know some English. Many people in Haiti know some French. By presuming it is ok to use only English in France, you are dismissive of the cultural legitimacy of their language. 
If you presume it is ok to use only French in Haiti, you are dismissive of the cultural legitimacy of Haitian Creole. "

-TiWil 

Mandaly says: Thank you TiWil. It needed to be said. Some foreigners are misled into thinking that they will be prepared to navigate in this Caribbean island if their French is good only to find out that they were wrong.
This happened to a group of missionaries in the summer of 2010. They were leading a youth group to Haiti and had searched the internet for French songs and leaflets - when they got to Haiti there were a lot of confusion.
I guess if you're going to deal with the very few elites and political officials then your French will open some doors in Haiti, but if you want to deal with the people then you need to use the Creole language.

Haitian Creole ↔ English Reference, Look up Haitian Creole and English Words

Hello, Im looking for a song in the Chant D'Desparance, but i don't know the Title. The song goes..Nau ou menm ki Genyen Lavi pou kesa Map Soufri. Can you tell me what page I can find this song in the Chant D'desparance?

#48 Echo Des Elus

Jezi se ou sèl ki fòs mwen
Poukisa w’abandone mwen
Chak jou m leve m’ape kriye
Ouvri je w pou wè mizè mwen

Nan ou menm ki genyen lavi
Poukisa mwen menm m’ap soufri
Kounye a mwen prèt pou mouri
Pa kite m peri senyè

Dlo nan zye’m sèvi nouriti
E m konnen ou gen tout pouvwa
Retire sa’k pa bon nan mwen
Pou m kapab sèvi ou Senyè

Si se peche m ki fè m’ap soufri
Mwen vini mande ou padon
O bon Sovè di yon mo pou mwen
Pou m pa wont devan lènmi m yo

Zanmi mwen Jezi ap rele w
De bra li louvri l’ap tann ou
Pa kite Satan touye ou

Vini li va ba ou lavi

Haitian Creole ↔ English Reference, Look up Haitian Creole and English Words

How do you say someone speaks the language fluently? Li pale angle kouraman or is it Li pale Angle kourat?

Li pale Angle kouran. - He/ She speaks fluent English

Li pale Angle kou rat. -  He / She speaks English extremely well.

Haitian Creole ↔ English Reference, Look up Haitian Creole and English Words

I will appreciate the correct way to say "your mother's exquisite eyes" ......

Some attributes to translate the English word exquisite in Creole are also used to generally for the word beautiful in H. Creole:
bèl, delika, atiran, kokèt, admirab

I would translate that as:
bèl zye delika manman w

Haitian Creole ↔ English Reference, Look up Haitian Creole and English Words

What does "Tijwa" mean

Sounds like someone's nickname to me... which translates "little joy"


Haitian Creole ↔ English Reference, Look up Haitian Creole and English Words

This is actually not a question. I just want to express my appreciation.......

"This is actually not a question. I just want 
to express my appreciation for the time and effort that goes into this blog
site. I have been using your site as a resource for a WHILE now (maybe 2 years)
and it has been an enormous help to me!! I think it probably takes a lot to be
diligent and consistent with something like this, and I just want you to know
how grateful I am to you, as I'm sure, many others are as well!! For the last 5
years, I have worked with an orphanage on the outskirts of Port-au-Prince. I
travel there maybe a couple times a year. At first, even though I didn't
understand a WORD that was said, it was absolutely amazing getting to know the
kids and watching them grow --- that is, until body language and hugs could no
longer bridge the gap left by the language barrier. I was desperate to
communicate with them on a deeper level and this blog site has been a HUGE aid
in helping me do just that!! Mwen toujou gen anpil aprann, men, kounyea lè m wè
timoun yo, mwen ka konprann majorite yo di mwen a e piti a piti map aprann
kiminike kè mwen avèk yo. Thank you for what you are doing here :) God
bless!!"


Mandaly says:  Mèsi anpil. I appreciate your comment. Kontinye aprann toujou :)

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Thursday, February 26, 2015

What is another common expression that I can use for the word voryen

Men wi! Absolutely!
Kokorat!
Avadra!
Vagabon!
Sanmanman!
Malandren!
Fritè!
etc...


Haitian Creole ↔ English Reference, Look up Haitian Creole and English Words

what is meaning of a man putting his red briefs under woman mattress or baby mommy mattress

I guess he's marking his territory :)
Basically he wants to own her for life.
They do more than that ...sometimes his and her "briefs" are sewn together and placed under the mattress... very desperate move.

Haitian Creole ↔ English Reference, Look up Haitian Creole and English Words

Ki jan ou di "nevermind" an kreyol? lol. M konprann kounye a :)

I miss your posts Mandaly! I hope all is well with you and your family. Thank you for all the work you put into the blog over the last 4 years!

I don't really understand this - does "kot" mean side of the family? Li se sè franck kot manma,mwen se frè franck kot papa sa vle di jonatha pa sè mwen.

Yes.

Frè kot papa meaning brother from the father's side ... a stepbrother
Li se sè m kot manman m meaning she's my sister from my mother's side meaning we have the same mom but not the same dad ... a step sister

Haitian Creole ↔ English Reference, Look up Haitian Creole and English Words

I can't understand this because I don't know what "yen" is. Pou manman w, ou tap mande m ou yen pou grann ou. For your mother, you were going to ask me “yen” for your grandmother?

Looks like the word "yen"  should have been "anyen".

Haitian Creole ↔ English Reference, Look up Haitian Creole and English Words

Map pose w ton kesyon ou par kraze Jonathan?

I don't get it either. Perhaps they meant to sa "pa kraze m ...."



Haitian Creole ↔ English Reference, Look up Haitian Creole and English Words

It appears to me that most of the time the adjectives in Creole don't follow the gender of the noun. But sometime it does. Like I see "Mwa pwochen" and I see "Semèn pwochèn". Are there some rules for this or does it only comes from common usage? Also does the gender of the nouns are inherited from French or is there somewhere I can find a dictionary that gives the gender of the nouns?

Principally there's no agreement between the gender of nous and adjectives in Haitian Creole but we do have a very few instances where the French articulation is preserved in the Haitian Creole language and it just seems as if there are some sort of agreement where the adjective would change depending on the gender of the noun.  It is not so in Haitian Creole.

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How do you say: "You are out of your mind¨" AND "you are not in your right mind" ? I am trying to relate these expressions to a discourse I have in Haitian creole concerning the subject of "bonsans". Mesi anpil pou tout travay ou fe pou Nou.

You are out of your mind 
(Ou pèdi bon sans ou)
Ou fin tòltòl nèt
Tèt ou pati
Ou pèdi tout fakilte w
Tèt ou pa byen
Lòlòj ou fin chavire

Haitian Creole ↔ English Reference, Look up Haitian Creole and English Words

Gen "materyèl" ak nou gen "materyo." Kisa diferans? In regards to construction, I think one is used to talk about materials such as sand, gravel, blocks, etc., while the other can be used to talk about tools. or maybe there is no difference.?

materyo - construction equipment and tools
materyèl - gear, stock, stuff

Haitian Creole ↔ English Reference, Look up Haitian Creole and English Words

What does rann li kont mean?

rann kont has two meanings.
rann kont - to account for
rann (pronoun) kont - to realize, to become aware.

1.Mwen pa't rann mwen kont se te ak yon vòlè m t'ap boule.
   I didn't realize that I was dealing with a crook.

2. Mwen byen ak misye lontan men se tou lotrejou la a mwen vin rann mwen kont ke se itilize li t'ap itilize'm.
    I've been friends with him for a long time but it's only recently I realized that he was just using me.

3. Li pa't rann li kont ke tout moun t'ap gade li nan yon kamera.
    He didn't realized that everyone was watching him on a camera.

and the other meaning.....

4. Nan jou jijman an tout moun pral rann kont de sa yo te fè sou tè a.
    On judgement day everyone will give account of what they did on earth. 

5. Se granmoun mwen ye.  Sa mwen fè pa konsènen okenn moun. Mwen pa gen pou m rann kont bay pyès moun.
I'm an adult.  What I do is my business. I don't have to report to anyone.

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The word maybe in francais is petet. Is the creole word poutet sa the same expression as maybe?

Non it's not the same.
poutèt sa or pousa - ...the reason why

Misye wont fanmi l se poutèt sa li pa janm kite yo konnen kote l'abite.
or
Misye wont fanmi l se pousa li pa janm kite yo konnen kote l'abite
He is ashamed of his family that's why he doesn't let them know where he lives.

Mwen te bliye se te fèt ou jodi a, eske se poutèt sa ou fache konsa a?
or
Mwen te bliye se te fèt ou jodi a, eske se pousa ou fache konsa a?
I forgot it was your birthday today, is it why you're so angry?


Haitian Creole ↔ English Reference, Look up Haitian Creole and English Words

Ok, I am getting really confused. At times Haitian people say BONJOU all day long. But other times they start saying BONSWA after 12pm. So when do we say BONJOU or BONSWA pls? Are there other time expressions that are said during the day. Thanks

 bonjou - good morning, hello is used from morning until noon time.
After noon time Haitians usually say bonswa which is good afternoon or good evening.

Haitian Creole ↔ English Reference, Look up Haitian Creole and English Words

Wednesday, February 25, 2015

I found the word "alòske" (English "whereas" or "while") in this passage from Bib la. "Konsènan bagay yo sakrifye bay zidòl, ebyen, nou konnen, nou tout, nou gen konesans. Men, konesans fè moun gonfle ak ògèy, alòske, lamou edifye moun." (1 Korent 8:1 Bib la) Is "alòske" ever used in spoken communication in Haiti? And is "konsènan" used in spoken Kreyòl? Thanks!

Yes and Yes.  They are used all the time in everyday conversation.


Haitian Creole ↔ English Reference, Look up Haitian Creole and English Words

Yon lòt fwa, monchè. Jòdi a, lè nou lage, m ap prese. This is a dialog between two students on their way to class. Does lé nou lage mea, when they let us out? mesi anpil!

At the beginning of a sentence in kreole " se sa k fe'" does that translater as " so" or "there fore " in kreyol?

Se sa k fè - this is why

1.
M te gen tètfèmal se sa k fè m t'al kouche.
I had a headache that's why I went to lie down.

2.
Jezi ap viv nan kè m se sa'k fè kè m kontan konsa.
Jesus lives in my heart that's why I'm so happy.

3. 
Moun sa yo se kriminèl se sa'k fè m di w  pa asosye ak yo
These people are criminals, this is why I tell you not to hang out with them.

It's also another way to as why?

4.
Sa k fè sa?
Why is that?


5a.
Sa'k fè w tris konsa?
Why are so sad?

5b.
Mwen sonje manman m se sa k fè m tris.
I miss my mother that's why I'm sad.


6a
Sa'k fè w twouble konsa?
Why are you so upset?

6b
Men te fè w konfyans men ou ban m manti se sa'k fè m twouble. 
I trusted you but you lied to me that's why I'm upset.



7a
Sa'k fè w malelve konsa?
Why are you so rude?

7b
Mwen pa konnen kouman pou m boule ak moun se sa k fè pafwa m fè malelve.
I don't know how to deal with people that's why sometimes I'm rude.


8a.
Sa'k fè w pa ka dòmi?
Why can't you sleep?

8b
Chen w lan jape tout lannuit se sa k fè m pa ka dòmi.
Your dog barks all night that's why I can't sleep.


9a
Sa'k fè ou p'ap lekòl demen?
Why won't you be in school tomorrow?

9b
Mwen dwe ale kay doktè se sa' k fè m p'ap la.
I must go to the doctor that's why I wont be there .

Haitian Creole ↔ English Reference, Look up Haitian Creole and English Words

Alo Mandaly! Sa fé lontan depi kew pa upload anyen sou blog la! But anyways, I just have one tiny question. What does "estebedjé" mean in kreyol? P.S. you could just email me the explanation. Mesi davans! Hope you're not neglecting the blog! Miss you!

estebedje, bègwè, djèdjè, or egare - idiot, bonehead

Haitian Creole ↔ English Reference, Look up Haitian Creole and English Words

How do you say in Haitian Creole, "Stand TALL! Stand STRONG! Be PROUD! Be PROUD!"? And I mean this in a sense of being proud and unashamed of yourself, your race, your beautiful African roots and origins, even in the face of evil opposition. Xoxox

Stand tall!
Kenbe tèt ou wo!
kenbe tèt ou byen wo!

Stand strong!
Kanpe fèm!
Kenbe fèm!
Pa brennen!

Be proud!
Se pou w gen fyète!


Haitian Creole ↔ English Reference, Look up Haitian Creole and English Words

Monday, February 23, 2015

What is ‘pa pran sa pour anyen’. I translated it as ‘to take something for nothing’. I think I’m missing something – your thoughts? Also what is aryen?


”anyen” and “aryen” se menm bagay :)

...pa pran pou anyen
to have hard feelings
to be no wimp
to not be faint at heart
to be immune to …

Usually in regards to a situation

They walked through the streets filled with dead rotting bodies but they were immune to the sight. They were used to it.
Yo t’ap mache nan lari a ki te plen kadav k’ap pouri men yo pa’t pran sa pou anyen. Yo te abitye ak sa.
or

Yo t’ap mache nan lari a ki te plen kadav k’ap pouri men sa pa’t fè yo anyen.  Yo te abitye ak sa.

Haitian Creole ↔ English Reference, Look up Haitian Creole and English Words