Bonjou! Learn to Speak Haitian Creole

Bonjou! ...Mèsi! ...E Orevwa! Check out our Audio bits. Do as many exercises as you need. Take an online QUIZ and get your answers right away. Finish a crossword puzzle. Reinforce your learning with the Audio/Video exercises. Search for English or Haitian Creole words translation. Also search the whole site for expressions, idioms and grammar rules. And ask questions about the language in the ASK QUESTIONS HERE section.

Most requested translations added here for your convenience: I love you → Mwen renmen w. I miss you → Mwen sonje w. My love!Lanmou mwen!

Monday, November 18, 2013

Dear Mandaly, I just saw your videos on creole definite articles. They were a pleasure to watch. Although, I have a couple of questions concerning the definite articles.What do you think when the vowel "i" ending a word but preceded by a nasalized consonant? For example, "fanmi an" or "mi an". What do yo think when when a word ends in a nasalized consonant, it is not only followed by "nan" but also "lan" indifferently? I have heard haitians and even me using both of them interchangeably. For example, "machin nan/lan", "plim nan/lan" or "moun nan/lan". What about words ending in "ng" or "gn", do they take "nan" as well as "lan" or only "nan"? For example, "Bilding nan or lan", "Djòging nan or lan" or "boling nan or lan". In case you didn't know, they translate "building", "jogging", and "bowling" respectively. Let me know what you think of those because they were not covered in your videos.


"What do you think when the vowel "i" ending a word but preceded by a nasalized consonant? For example, "fanmi an" or "mi an". "

You would think that the article for fanmi is “a”, but it is “an”... because of the nasal sound in the first syllable of the word.  The same goes for zanmi, jenou (where “ou” is nasal), lanmou, mi (“m” is nasal), etc…   When you see these words, you might be looking at the vowel at the end,  but you should think about the sound instead. If ou start with a nasal sound, you're prone to end with a nasal sounds.  When you say "zanmi", it feels more natural to add "an" at the end then to add "a".
.......

What do yo think when when a word ends in a nasalized consonant, it is not only followed by "nan" but also "lan" indifferently? I have heard haitians and even me using both of them interchangeably. For example, "machin nan/lan", "plim nan/lan" or "moun nan/lan". 

In some regions of Haiti, they don’t use “nan” for article.  Where I am from, we use it.  Mr Paultre who translated the 1999 version of the KJV bible does not use “nan”.  He uses “lan”.  I don't think you'll find "nan" as a definite article in that version of the Creole bible.
....

What about words ending in "ng" or "gn", do they take "nan" as well as "lan" or only "nan"? For example, "Bilding nan or lan", "Djòging nan or lan" or "boling nan or lan". In case you didn't know, they translate "building", "jogging", and "bowling" respectively.

The rule for the words that end in “ng” is the same as the rule for the words that end in “n” or “m” sound.
It’s either “nan” or “lan” depending on where you’re from.

Haitian Creole ↔ English Reference, Look up Haitian Creole and English Words

1 comment: