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Thursday, February 13, 2014

Mandaly. An "E nou va (na) fe konesans ak bokou(anpil) moun demen maten." Yo se "bokou" ak "anpil pi ranplase nan moman an? M konnen sa "bokou"

Bonjou Rachal :)
Haitians don’t generally use “bokou” when they want to say “a lot (anpil)” unless it is to say “mèsi bokou”.  It might be a term that’s used more in other Creole cultures.

In that sentence it’s best to use “anpil”.
Dakò.

Haitian Creole ↔ English Reference, Look up Haitian Creole and English Words

4 comments:

  1. Bokou is used predominately in Kreyol Lwizyan. Anpil is used somewhat; but in LC it is spelled "ampil" instead; just like konprann is spelled "komprann" in LC. I am learning HC, so I want to focus on what is proper in HC, and not "mix and match" words from the different Creoles. Thank you for your help in this matter! You do not know how invaluable you are in schooling people to understand Creole! Or do you? Mesi bokou.

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    1. Mèsi anpil Rachal.
      I am glad this helps.
      It’s amazing how both the Louisiana and Haitian Creole vocabulary is so similar.
      How about sentence construction, how is Haitian Creole similar or different than the Louisiana Creole?
      Mèsi ankò

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  2. Madanm. There ARE differences between HC and LC in sentence structure.
    Pa egzanp: (LC) Non, mo parle pa Kreyol Ayisyen. (HC) Non, mwen pa
    pale Kreyol Ayisyen. ak: (LC) Vou ale drwat pa. (HC) Ou pa ale tou dwat.
    To me, HC is much more standardized than LC; in other words its more
    consistent in grammar rules. There are at least 10 different dialects of LC,
    if not more. LC is sort of all over the map compared to HC. Was French Guiana Kreyol more or less this different from HC to you? Mesi.

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    1. That's very interesting. French Guiana Creole is as different, to me, as Louisiana Creole. When spoken I do understand it, but about 5% of the message might be lost :)

      Thanks for your info. I do hope that LC is kept alive for generations to come. It sounds beautiful.

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